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THE NEWS SERVICE HEARD BY 26 MILLION LISTENERS TO COMMERCIAL RADIO IN THE UK [READ MORE]

Established in 1973 at the birth of commercial radio in the UK, IRN provides client stations with a continuous service of national and international news. The service comprises a ready to air hourly news bulletin, delivered live 24/7, in addition to a suite of pre-recorded news content in the form of news audio cuts on the main stories, written cues and scripts to help stations produce their own bulletins, plus plenty of extra material within sports news, showbiz and music news, money news and consumer technology news.

Top Stories

President Trump takes US out of Trans-Pacific Partnership trade deal

23 January

President Trump has signed an executive order to withdraw the United States from the Trans-Pacific Partnership (TPP).

He had promised to take such action in November, describing the trade deal as a "potential disaster for our country".
The agreement was designed to bring down tariffs and trade barriers between America and a number of Pacific Rim nations including Australia, New Zealand, Japan, Malaysia and Chile.
Mr Trump described his action on TPP as a "great thing for the American worker".
Sky's Diplomatic Editor, Dominic Waghorn, said: "His critics will say it's not putting America first because free trade is good for America, as it is for the rest of the world.
"It allows cheap goods to go to America (and) allows America to export its goods to the Pacific Rim countries more effectively."
:: Trump spokesman Spicer: Our intention is not to lie
White House press secretary Sean Spicer said in his daily press briefing: "When you enter into these multi-national agreements, you're allowing any country, no matter the size, to have the same stature as the United States in the agreement."
Mr Spicer added that such arrangements were "not always in the best interests of the United States", saying that bi-lateral agreements would be pursued instead.
"This is a strong signal that the Trump administration wants free and fair trade throughout the world," he told reporters.
Asked by Sky's US Correspondent, Cordelia Lynch, why Theresa May will be the first foreign leader to meet President Trump in Washington on Friday, Mr Spicer said: "I think we've always had that special relationship with Britain, and that reflects in the Prime Minister's first visit here.
"He's had a great conversation with her, and he looks forward to having her here, but we can always be closer."
:: Pound climbs to one-month high as Trump fears hit US dollar
Mr Trump has signed two other executive orders.
One bans US non-governmental organisations that receive federal funding from providing abortions abroad.
The other imposes a freeze on federal hiring.
Prior to signing the orders, Mr Trump welcomed a dozen business executives to the White House from companies including Ford, Dell Technologies and Tesla, telling them he would place taxes on imports if they were to move production outside the US.
At the same time, he promised to reduce corporate taxes and cut regulations.
:: Trump: FBI director James Comey 'more famous than me'
Meanwhile, the new President has resigned from his Trump business empire, the White House has said.
Mr Trump is being sued by a group of constitutional and ethics lawyers.
They are accusing him of violating the US Constitution by allowing his hotels and other businesses to take payments from foreign governments.
The lawsuit - filed in Manhattan by a non-profit organisation called Citizens for Responsibility and Ethics in Washington - claims that Mr Trump is "submerged in conflicts of interest".
Alleged conflicts include the state-owned Industrial and Commercial Bank of China's lease at Trump Tower in New York.
Mr Trump has described the lawsuit as "without merit".

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Trump spokesman Spicer: Our intention is not to lie

23 January

Donald Trump's spokesman has said the White House's intention is not to lie after a row over audience numbers at his inauguration.

Press secretary Sean Spicer also denied reports that those who had cheered Mr Trump during his appearance at the CIA's headquarters in Virginia at the weekend had been the President's supporters rather than spies.
In a long White House news conference, a reporter asked Mr Spicer: "Is it your intention to tell the truth from that podium?"
Mr Spicer replied: "I think sometimes you can disagree with the facts.
"Our intention is never to lie to you.
"We have a right to go out there and correct the record."
His comments came after he attacked the media for calling into question his claim that the audience for Mr Trump's inauguration was the "largest" ever.
Mr Spicer defended his attacks at the latest news conference by insisting his statement had been correct as he was including viewers on live streams and social media.
"It was the most watched inaugural. Just one network alone got 16.9 million people online," he said.
"There were tens of millions that watched that online, never mind the audience that was here.
"It's unquestionable and I don't see any numbers that dispute that."
:: Under Trump, reporters who write the truth will be called a 'liar'
He later admitted he was not saying that it was the largest audience to watch an inauguration in person.
Mr Spicer defended his boss over some media reports that staff he took with him to the CIA were the ones that cheered loudly during a speech he made, while the agency's staff clapped politely.
He claimed that just 10 of Mr Trump's staff were there and "10 people didn't yell that loud".
Mr Spicer went on to explain why he had been forced to attack the media to defend the President, saying: "It's not just about the crowd size... there is this constant theme to undercut what support he has.
"It's just unbelievably frustrating when you are continually told it's not big enough, it's not good enough, you can't win.
"He keeps getting told what he can't do... and then he goes and does it.
"There is this constant attempt to undermine the movement that he represents."
Also, on the day Mr Trump signed an executive order taking the US out of the Trans-Pacific Partnership, Mr Spicer told the news conference that Mr Trump had resigned from the Trump business empire.
Sky's Diplomatic Editor Dominic Waghorn said Mr Spicer had used the news conference to sound conciliatory with "what you might call a non-apology apology".
He added: "He's patched things up to a certain extent but I don't think the press will see this as a full apology. But he's trying to stress now that he is someone they can rely on. They'll have to make up their own mind about that.
"The other interesting thing about this was that he didn't take questions from the front row, the big beasts of American media... straight away. He took questions from people... from more conservative right-leaning organisations.
"The Trump White House is trying to be different."

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Prime Minister Theresa May was told about Trident missile test

23 January

The Prime Minister was told about last year's Trident missile test when she came into office, Downing Street has confirmed.

Theresa May's official spokeswoman declined to confirm or deny reports a missile malfunctioned during the test, saying only that the PM was told the operation was completed successfully.
Mrs May refused to answer questions on Sunday over what she knew about the test, amid claims there has been a cover-up of the incident.
On Monday she said she had "absolute faith" in Trident.
"I'm regularly briefed on national security issues, I was briefed on successful certification of HMS Vengeance and her crew," she said.
"We don't comment on operational details for national security reasons."
Defence Secretary Sir Michael Fallon was forced to go to the Commons to face questions on the issue.
He told MPs that a demonstration and shakedown "concludes each time with an unarmed missile firing.
"HMS Vengeance successfully concluded that shakedown operation."
A spokesman for David Cameron, who was Prime Minister when the test took place, said: ""As Downing Street has said, there is no set approach to publicising military operations of this nature.
"It would not be appropriate to comment further on such military tests for obvious reasons of national security."
The Sunday Times reported at the weekend that a Trident II D5 missile veered off course after being launched from HMS Vengeance off the coast of Florida in June.
The timing of the alleged failure is significant because it happened weeks before Parliament voted to spend £40bn on new Trident submarines.
The vote happened days after Mrs May became PM, and beforehand she set out the case for renewing the Trident system in a Commons speech in which she did not mention the test.
Mrs May's official spokeswoman told reporters at a regular Westminster media briefing that the PM was briefed on the "demonstration and shakedown" operation undertaken by the submarine when she came to power.
She was told the operation was successful, allowing Vengeance and its crew to return to service.
The spokeswoman went on to say that the Government did not publicly discuss the operational details of these kind of exercises.
This line was echoed by Business Secretary Greg Clark on Sky News earlier, despite the fact that tests in 2000, 2005, 2009 and 2012 were all publicised.
When asked whether Mrs May had been told of the result of the test before the Commons vote, her spokeswoman said: "The Defence Secretary and the Prime Minister are routinely informed when one of these specific 'demonstration and shakedown' operations are planned and on the outcome of them.
"In this instance, that was in June so it was under the then Prime Minister (David Cameron). On taking office, the current Prime Minister was briefed on a range of nuclear issues, including this.
"We have been clear that the submarine and the crew were successfully tested and certified.
"That was the purpose of the operation.
"What is also clear is that the capability and effectiveness of the Trident missile is unquestionable."
A member of David Cameron's media team has told Sky News it was "entirely false" to suggest the former Prime Minister had been involved in any sort of cover-up.
Conservative MP Dr Julian Lewis, who chairs the Defence Select Committee of MPs, told Sky News the blame for the alleged cover-up rested with Mr Cameron and not his successor in Downing Street.

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Bernie Ecclestone no longer in charge of F1

23 January

Bernie Ecclestone is no longer in charge of Formula One (F1) after almost 40 years in the driving seat.

The news was confirmed by Liberty Media as it said it had completed its takeover of the sport after snapping up shares from private equity firm CVC last year.
Ecclestone's position had been in doubt since the sale of the sport's commercial rights to Liberty - with Sky News reporting at the weekend that the new owners were preparing to oust 86-year old Ecclestone.
City Editor Mark Kleinman also revealed that Liberty was preparing a wider boardroom shake-up as it looked to make radical changes to the administration of F1.
Its plans include making F1 teams shareholders in the sport, expanding its commercial rights through new media and potentially changing the race structure to make it appeal to a younger fan base.
Liberty confirmed Ecclestone was to be replaced by Chase Carey, the media executive who became F1 chairman last year and that the British veteran had been handed the honorary title of chairman emeritus.
Ecclestone was quoted in a Liberty statement saying: "I'm proud of the business that I built over the last 40 years and all that I have achieved with Formula 1, and would like to thank all of the promoters, teams, sponsors and television companies that I have worked with.
"I'm very pleased that the business has been acquired by Liberty and that it intends to invest in the future of F1.
"I am sure that Chase will execute his role in a way that will benefit the sport."
Ecclestone is credited with driving the success of F1 throughout the world, though the sport never managed to properly crack the big US market.
After cutting short his own career as a racing driver following a number of crashes, he went on to own the Brabham team before his big business breakthrough - securing the rights to agree TV deals for F1 and becoming a billionaire in the process.
Mr Carey said on Monday: "F1 has huge potential with multiple untapped opportunities.
"I have enjoyed hearing from the fans, teams, FIA, promoters and sponsors on their ideas and hopes for the sport.
"We will work with all of these partners to enhance the racing experience and add new dimensions to the sport and we
look forward to sharing these plans overtime.
"I would like to recognise and thank Bernie for his leadership over the decades. The sport is what it is today because of him and the talented team of executives he has led, and he will always be part of the F1 family."

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Pound climbs to one-month high as Trump fears hit US dollar

23 January

The pound has climbed to its highest level against the dollar for a month after jitters over Donald Trump's presidency weakened the US currency.

It was up by a cent-and-a half against the dollar to just over $1.2520 by late Monday evening. The pound was also ahead against the euro.
Sterling's strength had earlier weighed down UK-listed shares, leaving the FTSE 100 - after its record-breaking start to January - 0.7% down by the end of Monday's trading at 7151, close to its level at the beginning of the year.
Shares in the FTSE's multinational companies tend to benefit from the weaker pound, as this makes their foreign currency earnings worth more in sterling terms.
The dollar was on the back foot as markets digested the protectionist rhetoric of Mr Trump's inauguration speech.
A weekend of protest and confrontation between the White House and the media, together with confirmation that the US is withdrawing from the Trans-Pacific Partnership trade deal, added to the negative sentiment.
US markets had been broadly cheered by Mr Trump's election, with hopes that an infrastructure spending boost and lower regulation and taxes would lift business.
But Rabobank strategist Philip Marey said the new President's inauguration speech rhetoric "sparked some concerns in the markets that he is going to play hard ball".
Kathleen Brooks, research director at City Index, said: "The initial reaction to the first few days of Donald Trump's presidency suggests that investors may be losing patience with the new occupant of the White House."
She said investors were worried about "protectionism and what a deeply unpopular president will mean for national unity and international diplomacy over the next four years".
The International Monetary Fund has warned that a "destructive" trade war could derail global growth.
It followed Mr Trump's threats to slap punitive tariffs on carmakers in Mexico exporting to the US, as well as confrontational campaign rhetoric over China.
The pound's climb on Monday follows a sharp surge last week - its strongest one-day rise since 2008 - as Theresa May's Brexit speech was viewed as less "hawkish" than expected on the terms of the EU divorce.
But is still 17% down in the wake of the EU referendum in June, whose result sent the currency to its lowest level against the dollar since 1985.

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