The news service heard by 26 million listeners to commercial radio in the UK

Top Stories

The Queen condemns 'very wicked' Manchester concert attack

25 May

The Queen has described the bombing in Manchester as "very wicked" as she visited victims being treated in hospital.

The monarch also met paramedics who were first on the scene and staff who worked through the night at the Royal Manchester Children's Hospital in the aftermath of Monday's attack.
Twelve children under the age of 16 - among the 64 casualties - were taken to the hospital by ambulance following the terror attack.
The Queen visited a ward where four young girls who were injured in the blast are recovering.
:: Live: Manchester Arena attack latest
She told Evie Mills, 14, and her parents: "It's dreadful. Very wicked, to target that sort of thing."
Millie Robson, 15, was wearing an Ariana Grande T-shirt as she met and shared words with the Royal visitor.
She revealed she had won two VIP passes for the concert at the Manchester Arena, taking a close friend with her to meet the global superstar backstage.
The Royal described the atrocity as "very alarming" and wished Millie a speedy recovery.
"It's not something you expect at all," the Queen said to father David, who was waiting at the exit of the arena for Millie when the bomb exploded.
:: The victims of the Manchester terror attack
Evie, from Harrogate, North Yorkshire, said she had been given tickets to the show as a birthday present.
The monarch told the youngster she thought Ariana Grande was a "very good singer", adding: "She sounds very, very good."
She told Evie's parents that "everyone is united" following the attack.
One of the young victims, 12-year-old Emily Murrell, was forced to miss the visit as she received surgery.
Mum Ruth, who was also hit with shrapnel and is still recovering in hospital, said her daughter would be incredibly disappointed but spoke to the monarch in her absence.

READ MORE

'Easy to upset' bomber Salman Abedi thrown out of mosque

25 May

Suicide bomber Salman Abedi was ejected from a Manchester mosque after a row in which he was accused of behaving like a child.

The dispute two months ago at the Salaam Community centre in Moss Side came after he had tried to hide in the mosque library to read religious books overnight.
Mosque chairman Abdullah Muhsin Norris, 70, told Sky News: "I am very unhappy knowing that he has come here and prayed here and seeing him reading the Koran and so on and the next minute you hear he blew up and 22 people are killed, 59 people injured
"It is very hard to believe someone could do that, but he has done it."
On the incident two months ago, he said: "I saw him staying over in the mosque and I told him that he had to leave."
"I was very annoyed with him. He said don't treat me like a child.
"He is very easy to be upset."
The chairman told Sky News he has banned political discussions at the mosque and has previously referred matters to the police where he has been concerned about radicalisation.
He said he did not report Abedi because the row in the library was the only incident that he had been concerned about.
The chairman added: "I am saddened at what has happened - I have grandchildren that could have gone there, any one of my kids could have gone there. I have children.
"If anyone is going to have that type of that conversation then I will squash it.
"I don't think you can ever do enough, you have to keep trying."
Other young men from south Manchester who went onto become IS fighters had also previously attended the same mosque.

READ MORE

Inside the flat where bomber Salman Abedi spent last evening

25 May

Suicide bomber Salman Abedi spent his final moments before his attack in a rental apartment in the centre of Manchester.

He last visited the flat at around 7pm on Monday, just three hours before he detonated his explosives at the Manchester Arena as people were leaving an Ariana Grande concert.
The flat is described on its website as being "ideal for the Phones4U Arena" - the name of the concert venue until 2015.
"It is privately owned by a couple who live locally," Sky's Crime Correspondent Martin Brunt said.
"It is a very small flat."
It normally rents for £75 a night.
Armed police raided the flat on Wednesday but no arrests were made. Police have conducted a number of raids and arrested eight people as they hunt for the network connected to Abedi.
It is not clear whether Abedi was staying at the flat in the days before the bombing or if it was being rented by someone else who he met there.
Police are expected to be investigating if the bomb was assembled at the address.
Brunt said one resident of the building reported "a strong smell of explosives" coming from behind the door.

READ MORE

Police stop sharing Manchester attack intelligence with US after leaks

25 May

Police will stop sharing details of the Manchester attack with the US until assurances are given that there will be no more leaks, officials have told Sky News.

British police and security services are said to be furious after their US counterparts leaked pictures from the crime scene to the media.
The New York Times published pictures that appear to show remnants of the attacker's backpack and a suspected trigger device and battery from the bomb.
The name of the attacker, Salman Abedi, also appeared in US media the day after the attack - before UK authorities had publicly named him.
The pause on information sharing is thought to involve "law enforcement" rather than intelligence agencies, such as the FBI, MI6 and MI5.
Prime Minister Theresa May has said she will use the NATO summit in Sicily to "make clear to President Trump that intelligence that is shared between our law enforcement agencies must remain secure".
Diplomatic language has been used by the Government to describe the leaks.
:: What do US leaks mean for 'special relationship'?
:: Live - Latest as police hunt terror network after attack
Defence Secretary Sir Michael Fallon called it "obviously disappointing" and Home Secretary Amber Rudd said she had made it "very clear" the leaks must stop.
But privately, police and security chiefs, as well as senior politicians, are said to be livid.
Intelligence sharing between Western allies is routine on the understanding it is not leaked or passed on without consent.
:: Bomber in Germany 'four days before attack'
:: Inside flat where bomber spent last evening
UK authorities are angry because such disclosures could compromise their investigation, while also potentially undermining the confidence of the victims and their families in the inquiry.
A Government source said: "We are furious. This is completely unacceptable.
"These images leaked from inside the US system will be distressing for victims, their families and the wider public.
"The issue is being raised at every relevant level by the British authorities with their US counterparts."

READ MORE

Manchester attack: UKIP says May must bear 'some responsibility'

25 May

UKIP's deputy chairman has backtracked after saying Theresa May must bear "some responsibility" for the Manchester terror attack because of cuts to the police.

Suzanne Evans was answering questions from journalists after attacking the Prime Minister's record as home secretary during the launch of the party's manifesto in central London.
When asked by Sky's Adam Boulton what was the point of listing Mrs May's failures at the Home Office if it was not to suggest she should bear some responsibility for the security failings which led to Monday's attack, Ms Evans said: "I think she must bear some responsibility.
"All politicians who voted for measures to make cuts bear some responsibility.
"I think when 9/11 happened we should have had a serious rethink about immigration. It didn't happen."
When pressed on her claim Ms Evans at first denied saying it, and then sought to clarify her remark, telling journalists: "The only people who are responsible for what happened in Manchester are the terrorists. Let me make that absolutely clear.
"I think sometimes we are too quick to blame other people but the terrorists in these situations.
"But the circumstances that allowed their ideology to breed, that allowed their hatred to spread, politicians should have taken action on that long ago."
Ms Evans was appearing alongside leader Paul Nuttall, who called for a "far more muscular approach" to social integration as he backed seizing the passports of Britons who leave to fight for Islamic State.
He called Islamic fundamentalism "one of the major issues" facing politicians and said he made no apologies for calling radical Islam a "cancer in our society".
:: Paul Nuttall profile: 'Bootle Boy' trying to keep UKIP alive
UKIP is pledging to fund 20,000 extra troops and police officers, as well as 7,000 extra prison officers and 4,000 more border officers.
A key focus of the launch was an attack on Mrs May's record as home secretary.
Mr Nuttall said "The Prime Minister has, during her time in high office, presided over cuts to our police service and reductions in our Armed Forces too.
"She has put pressure on the police to lower the numbers of stops and searches they carry out.
"And no progress whatever was made reducing the level of immigration in order to give social cohesion a chance to advance."
The UKIP leader added that the emergency services' response to Monday's atrocity in Manchester showed it was time to invest in them.
Ms Evans said "nothing will change" if Mrs May wins a large majority on 8 June.
"Theresa May might like to portray herself as a strong and stable leader who can tackle extremism, but her record suggests otherwise," she said.
"Theresa May has allowed jihadists who fought alongside Islamic State back into our country.
"She has failed to prevent extremists spreading hatred in our universities and our mosques.
"Under her watch, even non-EU migration spiralled out of control and net migration reached record highs."

READ MORE