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THE NEWS SERVICE HEARD BY 26 MILLION LISTENERS TO COMMERCIAL RADIO IN THE UK [READ MORE]

Established in 1973 at the birth of commercial radio in the UK, IRN provides client stations with a continuous service of national and international news. The service comprises a ready to air hourly news bulletin, delivered live 24/7, in addition to a suite of pre-recorded news content in the form of news audio cuts on the main stories, written cues and scripts to help stations produce their own bulletins, plus plenty of extra material within sports news, showbiz and music news, money news and consumer technology news.

Top Stories

Ex-UN boss Kofi Annan: Proxy wars in fight 'until last Syrian life'

29 September

Russia has said it will press on with its bombing campaign in Syria, as the United Nations pleaded for medical evacuations from war-ravaged Aleppo.

The developments came as former UN secretary general Kofi Annan told Sky News that "proxy wars" in Syria could prolong the five-year-old conflict.
Moscow is supporting a ferocious assault by the forces of Syrian President Bashar al Assad on the rebel-held eastern part of the city.
There have been calls for it to stop bombing Aleppo and join efforts to restore the shattered truce.
But the calls were rejected by Kremlin spokesman Dmitry Peskov, who blamed the US for the latest surge in violence.
He said Russia would "continue the operation of its air force in support of the anti-terrorist activity of Syria's armed forces".
US President Barack Obama and German Chancellor Angela Merkel have condemned the Russian and Syrian airstrikes as "barbarous", according to the White House.
Meanwhile, Mr Annan told Sky News: "The war has been a failure and what has been happening is outraging, and it is the Syrian people who are paying the price.
"There are lots of forces at work. There are proxy wars going on. And you sometimes have the feeling that some are determined to fight until the last Syrian life." 
He was speaking after the UN's aid chief warned that Aleppo faces a humanitarian catastrophe "unlike any" witnessed so far in the fighting.
"Let me be clear: east Aleppo this minute is not at the edge of the precipice," Stephen O'Brien told the Security Council.
"It is well into its terrible descent into the pitiless and merciless abyss of a humanitarian catastrophe unlike any we have witnessed in Syria."
US ambassador Samantha Power described the past week as "the most savage we've seen in an incredibly savage five-plus-year war".
In the latest offensive more than 1,000 people have been killed by 1,700 air strikes on east Aleppo alone.
Ms Power said it was "soul-shattering" and accused Russia and President Assad of "unleashing a savagery" against civilians.
"We're at a turning point," she said.
Mr O'Brien appealed for action from the Security Council after diplomatic efforts at week's General Assembly meeting ended in failure.
"This revolting situation in Aleppo must, please, be the SOS, the May Day call, to the international community," he said.
In a sign of how desperate the situation has become, the UN has warned that "probably hundreds" of people needed to be evacuated from Aleppo for medical reasons.
The organisation's deputy envoy for Syria, Ramzy Ezzeldin Ramzy, said: "The bombing must stop. Civilians must be protected. And the cessation of hostilities must be restored."
His comments came a day after two of the largest hospitals in east Aleppo were bombed.
The present UN Secretary, General Ban Ki-moon, has described the attack as a war crime.

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Senior lawyer on national child abuse inquiry resigns after being suspended

29 September

The top lawyer in the Independent Inquiry into Child Sexual Abuse has quit a day after being suspended from his role.

Chairwoman Professor Alexis Jay said she had accepted Ben Emmerson QC's decision to step down from the post of senior counsel after two years.
Mr Emmerson was suspended on Wednesday night amid reports he was about to resign following disagreements with Prof Jay.
His departure was announced just hours after his junior colleague Elizabeth Prochaska confirmed she had also left her role.
In a statement Prof Jay said: "There is no truth in suggestions that he has resigned due to a difference of opinion with me about the next steps for the inquiry."
Prime Minister Theresa May had earlier said the "really important" inquiry would go ahead as planned, amid claims it was in "crisis".
In his resignation letter, posted on the inquiry's website, Mr Emmerson said he would be "sad" to leave and remained "totally committed to securing a fair and just result for those who matter most, the victims and survivors of childhood abuse".
He added: "Shortly after you (Prof Jay) took over, you announced a review of the Inquiry's ways of working to identify any changes that may be necessary in the public interest.
"When you decided to re-appoint me as counsel to the Inquiry in early September, I had my personal doubts about whether I was genuinely the right person to steer that review process.
"Since then, it has become clear to me that I am not the person to take this review forward on your behalf.
"There is no truth in suggestions that I have resigned due to a difference of opinion with you about the next steps for the Inquiry."
Mrs May has insisted the wide-ranging investigation will not be scaled back despite the recent controversies.
These also include the sudden resignation of its previous chair Dame Lowell Goddard, who cited the "legacy of failure" from its beginnings as one of the reasons for standing down.
Mrs May, who set up the inquiry in 2014 when she was Home Secretary, said: "The current Home Secretary (Amber Rudd) has made clear the original terms of reference were the right ones and I think that's important.
"We should always remember why it is that the inquiry was set up in the first place and when those terms of reference were set they were agreed with victims and survivors and it is victims and survivors who are at the heart of this inquiry."
:: The UK's child abuse inquiry in numbers
The £100m probe has been dogged by controversy since its launch and as already had four chairwomen including Prof Jay.
It was branded a "categorical disaster" by child abuse survivors and leading lawyers after Mr Emmerson's suspension, which reignited the debate around whether it should be broken up to make it more manageable.
The inquiry's brief stretches back 60 years and covers institutions including the church, schools, councils and Westminster.
It was set up amid claims of an establishment cover-up following allegations that a paedophile ring operated in Westminster in the 1980s.
Labour MP David Winnick, who sits on the Home Affairs Committee, has called on Mrs Rudd to make a statement to the Commons when it returns after the summer break on 10 October.
He also said Prof Jay and Mr Emmerson should appear before the committee.

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One dead and dozens injured after train crashes into New Jersey station

30 September

A woman who died after a train derailed and ploughed into a station in New Jersey was hit by debris as she stood on the platform, officials say.

A further 108 people were injured, including 74 who were taken to hospital, when the crowded commuter train smashed into Hoboken station during the morning rush hour.
Among those hurt was the driver, who has been described as "critically injured". However, he is said to be well enough to be cooperating with police as they investigate the crash.
People pulled concrete off bleeding victims and passengers kicked out windows to escape after the train ground to a halt in a covered waiting area.
The collision caused a section of the station's roof to collapse and scattered debris across the platform.
"It just never stopped. It was going really fast and the terminal was basically the brake for the train," Nancy Bido, a passenger on the train, told WNBC-TV in New York.
Another passenger, Bhagyesh Shah, said: "It was for a couple seconds, but it felt like an eternity."
Governor Chris Christie confirmed one woman had died after early reports in the US suggested three people had been killed.
"We need to pray for the one fatality we did have so far and for the other victims," he said in an interview on CNN.
"The engineer who was operating the train was also critically injured," he later told a news conference. "He is at a local hospital and cooperating with law enforcement officials in the investigation."
Mr Christie said most of those injured were passengers on board the train when it crashed, and not people waiting on the platform.
However, the woman who died was not on the train, he said, but was struck by debris as the vehicle struck and parts of the building's ceiling started to come down.
Witnesses reported seeing passengers bleeding and at least one woman trapped under concrete.
Ross Bauer, an IT specialist who was heading to work in Manhattan, was sitting in the third or fourth car when the train pulled into the station.
"All of a sudden, there was an abrupt stop and a big jolt that threw people out of their seats," he said.
"The lights went out, and we heard a loud crashing noise - like an explosion - that turned out to be the roof of the terminal.
"I heard panicked screams, and everyone was stunned."
US railroads are under government orders to install positive train control, a safety system designed to prevent accidents by automatically slowing or stopping trains if they are travelling too fast.
However, the deadline has been repeatedly extended and none of New Jersey Transit's trains or tracks is fully equipped with the system yet.
The train had left Spring Valley, New York, at 7.23am and crashed into Hoboken Terminal at 8.45am, according to New Jersey Transit.
Images of the scene posted on Twitter showed what appeared to be debris from the roof and supporting pillars strewn across the platform, with a train carriage twisted sideways.
Another image showed wreckage, cables and pipes dangling from the building's ceiling, which appeared to have collapsed.
One tweeter posted a picture of a man clutching his head with blood down his arm and T-shirt.
Hoboken lies on the west bank of the Hudson River across from New York City.
Its station, one of the busiest in the metropolitan area, is used by many commuters travelling into Manhattan from New Jersey and further afield.
Rail services in the area were suspended due to the accident.
NJ Transit spokeswoman Jennifer Nelson said she did not know how fast the train was travelling at the time of the crash.
Bob Chipkevich, who formerly headed the National Transportation Safety Board's train crash investigations section, says the agency will be looking at whether the train was exceeding speed limits, both when it was approaching the station and when it entered the area.
Last month, the Federal Railroad Administration (FRA) said New Jersey Transit had a lot of work yet to do on installing the necessary safety technology to slow speeding trains.
In response, New Jersey Transit said the FRA report did not reflect the work accomplished.
A crash at the same station on a different train line injured more than 30 people in 2011.

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Southampton FC's Eric Black latest figure named in Telegraph sting

30 September

Premier League side Southampton have confirmed assistant manager Eric Black is the latest figure to be caught in a Daily Telegraph sting.

The club issued a statement saying they had been made aware manager Claude Puel's number two would feature in an article on Friday as part of the paper's ongoing investigation into alleged corruption in football.
Saints bosses said they had requested to be sent details of the story, but that the Telegraph had not shared any information.
"We have today contacted The FA and The Premier League, and intend to work closely with both bodies on this matter when the facts become clear," a club spokesman said.
"Southampton Football Club is fully committed to investigating any situation that directly or indirectly relates to our club, employees or the wider community."
The Telegraph has released footage which it claims shows Black discussing how staff at other clubs could be induced to pass on information about players for money.
It comes after a series of damning reports by the Telegraph, the first of which cost Sam Allardyce the England job.
The 61-year-old had been filmed apparently trying to broker a £400,000 deal and telling businessmen how to evade strict rules on third-party ownership - a practice banned by FIFA since May 2015.
Allardyce apologised, saying he was "extremely sorry" and was leaving the country to reflect on his "huge error of judgement".
On Thursday, Barnsley sacked assistant head coach Tommy Wright following claims he took a £5,000 bung to help place players at his club.
It is alleged he accepted the money during a series of meetings with reporters posing as Far East businessmen in which he agreed to help sign players part-owned by them.
Wright, 50, has denied any wrongdoing.
The newspaper has also alleged Leeds United owner Massimo Cellino offered its undercover reporters, posing as an investment firm, a way around third-party ownership of players.
In a statement, the club stuck by Cellino, saying they had reviewed the paper's footage and "at no time" in the video clip did he suggest getting around the FA's rules on third-party ownership.
Queens Park Rangers manager Jimmy Floyd Hasselbaink has also been investigated, with the Telegraph claiming he agreed to be an ambassador for a sports company which proposed selling players to his club.
He would receive a fee of £55,000, ostensibly for giving a speech.
The paper alleges he was left open to accusations of a conflict of interest.
Former Chelsea and Leeds striker Hasselbaink has also denied any wrongdoing.
In a statement he said he was offered a fee to make a speech in Singapore and saw nothing "unusual" in that.
QPR said in a statement it was aware of the allegations and would carry out a "thorough internal investigation regarding this matter".
It added: "However, we have every confidence in our manager and the robust systems and processes the club has in place."

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Rosetta probe set to crash into comet as mission comes to an end

29 September

Europe's most ambitious-ever space mission will come to an end within hours as Rosetta is ordered to crash into the comet it has been circling for the last two years.

Controllers at the European Space Agency will put the spacecraft on a collision course with comet 67P.
It will descend at walking pace from an altitude of 12 miles (19km) towards the 'head' of the duck-shaped comet.
Rosetta will continue to sample gas and dust as it free-falls, and take a series of images of the surface.
Its final task will be to close in on one of the many pits that pockmark the comet. They are up to 425ft (130m) wide and 200ft (60m) deep and eject jets of gas and dust.
Scientists are intrigued by 'goosebumps' or 'dragon's eggs', one-metre lumps that line the pits and are thought to be the comet's building blocks when it formed 4.6 billion years ago.
Matt Taylor, one of the ESA scientists analysing the huge amounts of data sent back to Earth, said: "It's pleasing for me to see how the results are being put into context to how the solar system evolved.
"It is fantastic to have this data set and it has fantastic implications.
"Because there is so much data and it is so good there will be decades of work done it."
Impact is expected at around 12.20pm UK time on Friday, with confirmation expected 40 minutes later as the signal from the spacecraft disappears from instruments at mission control in Darmstadt in Germany.
Comet 67P is currently 450 million miles (720 million km) from Earth, travelling towards Jupiter at 32,000mph.
The sun's light is now too weak to power the spacecraft for much longer and mission control opted to end the mission with a collision while they could.
The mission has cost around £1.2bn. But it is the first time a spacecraft has orbited and landed on a comet.
It has detected complex forms of carbon not found on Earth, a building block of proteins called glycine, and for the first time phosphorus which is a key component of DNA.
Scientists say the chemical make-up supports the theory that comets smashing into the Earth billions of years ago brought the ingredients for life.
But contrary to expectations, the chemical signature of water on the comet differs to that of our oceans, suggesting comets like 67P did not fill our seas.
Ian Walters was involved in designing the spacecraft at Airbus Defence and Space in Stevenage in 1998.
He told Sky News Rosetta's encounter with the comet had been like "science fiction."
"At the time we were just building a spacecraft," he said.
"That was exciting enough, but now we are there and we can see what a comet looks like, it's thrilling.
 "We will be celebrating. It's a tremendous achievement. But also a bit sad because it's the end of a 20-year programme."

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