The news service heard by 26 million listeners to commercial radio in the UK

Top Stories

Prince Philip's 'unwavering loyalty' to Queen will be praised during Windsor Castle funeral

17 April

Prince Philip's "unwavering loyalty" to the Queen will be praised at his funeral, as well as the duke's "courage, fortitude and faith".

Although there is no sermon - as per the Duke of Edinburgh's request - the service will be a highly religious one.
During today's ceremony, several hymns will be sung by a small chorus of three choristers and a soprano, and Bible passages will be read out.
Among the songs picked out is the hymn Eternal Father, Strong To Save, traditionally associated with members of the navy like the Duke of Edinburgh.
It was also sung at the funeral of his beloved uncle, Earl Mountbatten of Burma, who was murdered by the IRA in 1979.
No members of the Royal Family will give a reading, and attendees have also been forbidden from singing.
The congregation has been limited to just 30 people due to coronavirus restrictions.
Among the attendees will be the Prince of Wales and his wife the Duchess of Cornwall, the Queen and Philip's other children, their grandchildren including the Duke of Cambridge and Harry, three of Philip's German relatives, three of the Queen's cousins and Philip's carriage driving companion Countess Mountbatten of Burma
Prime Minister Boris Johnson will watch the service on a television from Chequers.
Social distancing will be observed, and masks will be worn during the service.
The Queen will sit alone during the funeral for her husband of more than 70 years, who died on Friday 9 April.
In the Bidding, the Dean of Windsor will say: "With grateful hearts, we remember the many ways in which his long life has been a blessing to us."
"We have been inspired by his unwavering loyalty to our Queen, by his service to the Nation and the Commonwealth, by his courage, fortitude and faith.
"Our lives have been enriched through the challenges that he has set us, the encouragement that he has given us, his kindness, humour and humanity."
The order of service is similar to the Queen Mother's funeral in 2002.
Not having a lingering funeral was also in line with the duke's wishes.
Earlier this week, Harry said of his grandfather: "I know that right now he would say to all of us, beer in hand, 'Oh do get on with it!'"
Harry and William will not walk next to each other during the funeral procession.
The brothers will be separated by their cousin Peter Phillips as they walk behind their grandfather's coffin, which will be carried by a Land Rover hearse designed by Prince Philip himself.
Subscribe to the Daily podcast on Apple Podcasts, Google Podcasts, Spotify, Spreaker
Proceedings get under way at 3pm with a nationwide minute's silence.
Nearby Heathrow Airport has said it will not land planes for six minutes to coincide with the period of quiet.

READ MORE

Prince Philip: Queen shares private photograph of her and Duke of Edinburgh on holiday in Scotland

17 April

A poignant, private photograph of the Queen and the Duke of Edinburgh has been released on the eve of Prince Philip's funeral.

The picture shows the couple smiling together at the top of the Coyles of Muick near Balmoral in 2003.
The previously unseen image was taken by the Queen's daughter-in-law Sophie, Countess of Wessex, and was posted on the Royal Family's Twitter feed on Friday evening.
"The Queen wishes to share this private photograph taken with The Duke of Edinburgh at the top of the Coyles of Muick, Scotland in 2003," the post read.
The picture shows the couple relaxing on the Aberdeenshire hillside during a family holiday, one of many the couple spent together there during their 73-year marriage.
Her Majesty is so fond of the beauty spot that she named one of her corgi puppies after it.
She is pictured on the grass wearing a tartan skirt, blouse and cardigan, while her husband props himself up with his elbow, his hat placed on his knee.
The Queen, 94, chose the image to release to the world as she prepared to say goodbye to the duke, who died aged 99 last Friday.
It offers a more personal insight into the couple's relationship, which spanned more than seven decades.
Earlier on Friday the Royal Family uploaded several other pictures of the Queen and Philip together, describing him as a "loving husband" and "devoted father".
They also shared images of the customised Land Rover the prince designed to carry his coffin to Windsor on Saturday.
The Queen was last photographed driving in the grounds of Windsor Castle a week after Philip's death, and was back at work on Friday receiving calls from General David Hurley, Governor-General of Australia, and Canadian Prime Minister Justin Trudeau.
It is understood they were made by the national figures to convey their condolences to the Queen.

READ MORE

Prince Philip's funeral: Today's service will show just how much the Duke of Edinburgh was involved

17 April

The Royal Family in recent years have had their difficulties.

This has been a week to put those to one side, as they have come together to remember their papa, their grandpa and their beloved husband.
Like every family, the funeral will be their chance to say goodbye - but they will be aware that like so many royal events that have been held in Windsor, the eyes of the world will be on them.
Inevitably, this week the family reuniting in their grief has again brought a renewed interest in relationships and disagreements.
That understandably makes the family uncomfortable. It's one of the reasons the Queen has decided they won't wear military uniforms to avoid that being a distraction. They want the only focus to be the man who has been such an influential presence in all their lives.
And that is why the funeral will be the ultimate tribute to Prince Philip, albeit stripped back because of the COVID-19 pandemic.
In a strange twist of fate, the restrictions mean it is probably even more of the type of ceremony that the duke would have wanted.
The military procession will still be striking, and a fitting display for such an important national figure, but inside for the service itself, it will be his family who make up the congregation: his wife, his children and grandchildren who will sit in the quire, an intimate but ornate space next to the altar inside St George's Chapel, mourning his death quietly together.
What will come across in the funeral, from the music to the military procession, is just how much Prince Philip was involved in the planning.
The quirky touches, like the Land Rover he designed to carry his coffin, the fact buglers from the Royal Marines will sound "action stations" at the end of the service, it will unmistakably be a reflection of him, a reminder of how he was always respectful of tradition, dedicated to a life of public service but also not afraid to do things differently.
While the Royal Family want this to be a testament to his remarkable life and his lasting endeavours, this will be a deeply personal moment for them all.
The tributes this week have been in some ways surprisingly candid, beautifully warm and affectionate, for a family who usually like to keep their personal relationships private.
Their willingness to share with us photographs from their own collections, showing a side of Prince Philip we didn't often see in public, a part of him that clearly meant so much to them all.
They have been genuinely touched by the messages of condolence that have come from around the world and across the UK.
Subscribe to the Daily podcast on Apple Podcasts, Google Podcasts, Spotify, Spreaker
COVID-19 has meant they haven't been able to go out, meet people and engage with the public in the ways they may have wanted.
But the fact that they are still allowing cameras inside the castle grounds for this close family funeral, and will be sharing the order of service, shows a genuine desire that everyone can join them in this moment of mourning.
Remembering the duke, a dedicated consort and a man who they loved very much.

READ MORE

Prince Philip: The timings for the Duke of Edinburgh's funeral

17 April

The timings of Prince Philip's funeral have been confirmed. 

The proceedings will take place this afternoon and will stay within the grounds of Windsor Castle to avoid crowds gathering during the coronavirus pandemic, but will be televised to the nation.
Here is what we know about what will happen and when.
2.20pm to 2.27pm
Members of the Royal Family who are not in the procession begin arriving at St George's Chapel, where the service is taking place.
These include the Duchess of Cambridge and the Duchess of Cornwall.
2.27pm
The band in the quadrangle begins to play music.
The Land Rover which will carry the Duke of Edinburgh's coffin will enter the quadrangle.
It has been specially modified and designed by the duke himself.
A lifelong fan of Land Rover, the duke spent 16 years on the project and made changes including requesting a repaint in military green.
2.38pm
The Duke of Edinburgh's coffin will be lifted by members of The Queen's Company, 1st Battalion Grenadier Guards.
2.40pm
The music will stop.
2.41pm
The coffin will emerge from the state entrance of Windsor Castle along with members of the procession.
A royal salute will be made and the bearer party will place the coffin on to the Land Rover.
The vehicle would originally have transported the coffin 22 miles from Wellington Arch in central London to Windsor, but the pandemic has curtailed plans for military parades.
2.44pm
The Queen will depart the sovereign entrance in the state Bentley and the national anthem will play.
As the vehicle reaches the rear of the procession, it will pause briefly.
2.45pm
The procession will set off, led by the heads of the Armed Forces and other senior military figures.
Members of the Royal Family including Prince Charles, Princess Anne and Princes William and Harry will follow on foot immediately behind the coffin - and be joined by staff from Philip's household.
William and Harry will not walk side by side for the procession, instead separated by their cousin Peter Phillips.
Representatives from the Royal Navy, the Royal Marines, the Highlanders, 4th Battalion Royal Regiment of Scotland and the Royal Air Force will line the route.
Meanwhile, guns will be fired each minute from the east lawn of the castle by the King's Troop Royal Horse Artillery, and the Curfew Tower Bell will toll.
The procession will take eight minutes and will pass to the north side of the Round Tower.
At some point, the Queen's car at the end of the procession will stop outside the Galilee porch and the monarch will enter the chapel with the Dean of Windsor.
2.53pm
A Guard of Honour and Band from The Rifles will play the national anthem as the coffin enters Horseshoe Cloister.
The coffin will come to a stop at the foot of the West Steps of St George's Chapel.
3pm
The Royal Marines bearer party will carry the coffin to the chapel porch, where it will pause at 3pm for a nationwide minute of silence.
Members of the Royal Family in the procession will be stood at the bottom of the West Steps.
3.01pm
The Dean of Windsor and the Archbishop of Canterbury will receive the coffin inside the chapel, but most of the procession will not enter except for members of the Royal Family and the duke's private secretary, Archie Miller Bakewell.
The service will begin as the coffin enters the chapel and members of the Royal Family will take their seats.
A four-strong choir will sing at the service, but the congregation will not take part.
The duke's body will be laid to rest in the Royal Vault of St George's Chapel.

READ MORE

FedEx shooting: Gun violence is a 'national embarrassment' that needs to stop, Joe Biden warns

17 April

Joe Biden has described mass shootings as a "national embarrassment" that has to end.

A day after eight people were killed in an attack at a FedEx facility in Indianapolis, the US president said more must be done to reduce gun violence - and urged Congress to ban military-style assault weapons.
"Too many Americans are dying every single day from gun violence. It stains our character and pierces the very soul of our nation," Mr Biden told a White House briefing on Friday.
Mr Biden faces an uphill battle to significantly change the nation's firearms laws, despite the fact that 43,539 Americans died of gun violence in 2020.
House Speaker Nancy Pelosi said she was "horrified and heartbroken" by Thursday's incident and called for Congress to "urgently enact common sense" on gun control.
Families who have lost loved ones to gun violence have expressed frustration by the country's inaction.
Peter Read, whose daughter Mary was one of 32 people killed in a mass shooting at Virginia Tech University in 2007, said: "The time is indeed now to act, but the time has been now to act for years, for decades."
Police in Indianapolis have identified Brandon Scott Hole as the suspect behind the mass shooting in Indianapolis.
Deputy police chief Craig McCartt said on Friday that he was known to the authorities after the FBI raided his home last year following a call from his mother saying he might attempt "suicide by cop".
McCartt told a news briefing that investigators have searched his home for a second time and seized evidence including computers.
Hole opened fire at people in the car park of the FedEx facility where he used to work.
He killed four people outside before entering the building and killing four others before turning the gun on himself, McCartt told reporters.
"There was no disturbance, there was no argument. He just appeared to randomly start shooting," he said.
At least five other people were injured - one critically - with some walking to nearby hospitals for treatment.
The attack happened when employees at the facility, where Hole was last known to have worked in 2020, were changing shifts or having a meal break, the police chief said.
His colleague Randal Taylor said that a "significant" number of staff at the site were Sikh, after a local faith group said they were "sad to confirm" at least four of the victims were members of the community.
The eight were named by the police on Friday as Matthew R Alexander, Samaria Blackwell, Amarjeet Johal, Jaswinder Kaur, Jaswinder Singh, Amarjit Skhon, Karlie Smith and John Weisert.
Meanwhile, US police are continuing to face scrutiny over the fatal shootings of black men at the hands of law enforcement - as the trial of Derek Chauvin, the former officer accused of murdering George Floyd, continues.
In Chicago, people have been protesting the killing of 13-year-old Adam Toledo, who was shot by police on 29 March.
Tensions spilled over after bodycam footage was released showing the teenager's final moments.
In the video, Mr Toledo, who was Latino, can be seen running away from police down an alley as an officer shouts for him to stop and show his hands.
The boy obliges, stops and appears to hold his hands up as the officer shouts "drop it".
But a shot is then heard as the officer repeats the command, and the boy crumples to the ground while the officer asks if he is alright and calls for an ambulance.
Police say Mr Toledo was carrying a handgun, which was found at the scene.
It comes after a separate shooting left 20-year-old Daunte Wright dead in Minneapolis on 11 April.
Video footage shows white police officer Kim Potter shoot Mr Wright, who was black, during a traffic stop in Brooklyn Center.
Potter claims she accidentally used her gun instead of a Taser, but she has been charged with second-degree manslaughter.
Daily protests have been taking place outside the local police station ever since, with officers using tear gas grenades and rubber bullets to disperse demonstrators.
Mayor Mike Elliott hit back at police this week, warning that "gassing is not a human way of policing".
"This is a request and not an attempt to limit necessary law enforcement response," he told a news briefing on Friday.

READ MORE