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THE NEWS SERVICE HEARD BY 26 MILLION LISTENERS TO COMMERCIAL RADIO IN THE UK [READ MORE]

Established in 1973 at the birth of commercial radio in the UK, IRN provides client stations with a continuous service of national and international news. The service comprises a ready to air hourly news bulletin, delivered live 24/7, in addition to a suite of pre-recorded news content in the form of news audio cuts on the main stories, written cues and scripts to help stations produce their own bulletins, plus plenty of extra material within sports news, showbiz and music news, money news and consumer technology news.

Top Stories

Syria Fighting To Halt In A Week's Time

12 February

A plan has been agreed for a "nationwide cessation" of violence in Syria in a week's time, US Secretary of State John Kerry has said.

However, Islamic State, al Nusra and other terror groups will not be involved in the truce - and Russia has said it will be continuing its bombing campaign.
It is hoped that improving conditions on the ground will then pave the way for peace talks to be relaunched in Geneva.
Friday's breakthrough, described by Mr Kerry as a "pause" in the conflict, is designed to allow for humanitarian aid to be immediately "accelerated and expanded".
:: 'Nationwide Cessation of Hostilities' - Full Text From The UN
It could potentially end scenes like those seen in Madaya, a besieged town where thousands of Syrians have been ravaged by famine.
Within the coming days, "sustained delivery of assistance" will begin by air to Deir Ezzor - while embattled areas of Damascus, Madaya, Moadamiyeh and Kafr Batna will receive support by land. 
"Everybody today agreed on the urgency of humanitarian access," said Mr Kerry.
"What we have here are words on paper. What we need to see in the next few days are actions on the ground, in the field."
The nationwide pause in the fighting will "begin in a target of one week's time", said the Secretary of State.
Sergei Lavrov, the Russian foreign minister, called it a "first step" towards a ceasefire but said his country was still pressing ahead with its campaign of airstrikes.
Mr Kerry and Mr Lavrov both conceded that the "real test" would be whether all parties involved in the Syrian conflict honour their commitments in the coming weeks.
The marathon talks in Munich involved Russia and more than a dozen other countries.
Negotiations between Syrian President Bashar al Assad and the opposition broke down last month, and the UN has set a target date of 25 February for both sides to resume discussions.
Philip Hammond, the UK's Foreign Secretary, warned the cessation of hostilities would only work if Russia stops its airstrikes.
Its attacks have brought Syrian government forces to the verge of capturing the rebel stronghold of Aleppo, forcing tens of thousands of civilians to flee to the Turkish border.
In a statement, Mr Hammond said: "If implemented fully and properly ... this (deal) will be an important step towards relieving the killing and suffering in Syria.
"Russia, in particular, claims to be attacking terrorist groups and yet consistently bombs non-extremist groups including civilians." 
Fighting in Syria has killed an estimated 250,000 people - and also sparked the migration crisis which has seen millions of refugees leave their homes to find safety in Turkey, Lebanon and in Europe.

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Scientists Discover Ripples In Space And Time

11 February

US scientists have announced the discovery of ripples in space and time known as gravitational waves, in a breakthrough that could revolutionise astronomy.

Their existence was first predicted by Albert Einstein in his Theory of Relativity a century ago but has never been proven - until now.
To loud applause, researchers from the Advanced Laser Interferometer Gravitational Wave Observatory (LIGO) unveiled their findings in Washington DC.
Laser physicist Professor David Reitze, from the University of Florida, told the National Press Club: "Ladies and gentlemen, we have detected gravity waves. We did it."
At the news conference, they played what they called a "chirp" - the signal they heard last 14 September, believed to have come from the distant crash of two black holes.
It was a moment that might have surprised even Einstein, who also theorised that scientists would never be able to hear such gravitational waves.
A British member of the international team said it was "the biggest scientific breakthrough of the century".
Professor James Hough, from the University of Glasgow, said the find was more important than the missing Higgs boson, the so-called "God particle".
Other scientists compared Thursday's announcement to the moment Galileo took up a telescope to look at the planets.
The waves could help scientists learn more about what happened immediately after the Big Bang and how the universe expanded.
Gravitational waves, sometimes called the soundtrack of the universe, are elusive ripples in the fabric of space and time created by every massive object in the universe.
Catastrophic events, such as a collision between two black holes, can create waves that spread out across the universe.
A passing wave essentially stretches space in one direction and causes it to shrink in another.
"It's one thing to know soundwaves exist, but it's another to actually hear Beethoven's Fifth Symphony," said Marc Kamionkowsi, a physicist at Johns Hopkins University, who wasn't part of the discovery team.
Scientists hope that by detecting the waves, it may be possible to see parts of the universe that have so far remained hidden.
It may also allow them to unravel the mysteries of dark matter, the invisible material that makes up around 80% of the universe.
LIGO researchers have been using a $1.1bn device called a laser interferometer to detect the space-time ripples.
They say it is like a microphone that converts them into electrical signals.
Three such interferometers have been built for LlGO - two near Richland, Washington state, and the other near Baton Rouge, Louisiana.
At least two widely separated detectors, operated in unison, are needed to rule out false signals and confirm that a gravitational wave has passed through the earth.

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Plumber Finds Baby's Body In Grimsby Drain

11 February

A baby has been found dead in a drain in the garden of a house in Grimsby.

Police have launched an investigation after a plumber made the discovery at the property on Scartho Road shortly after noon on Thursday.
Forensic experts were at the home and carrying out an examination of the scene.
A Humberside Police spokeswoman said: "The investigation is at its early stages as police work to establish the circumstances of the incident."
She added that at this stage officers do not believe the occupants of the house are involved.
A post-mortem examination will take place on Monday.
There have been no arrests so far, and police are trying to establish how old the baby was and the whereabouts of the mother.

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Clooney: US Not Taking In Enough Refugees

12 February

George Clooney has told Sky News that America is not taking in enough refugees and must "do more" to help alleviate the crisis in Europe.

Speaking at the premiere of Hail, Caesar! at the Berlin Film festival, he said he would be meeting Germany's chancellor, Angela Merkel, to discuss what more can be done by both the US and Hollywood.
"The US needs to do more as we know, taking 10,000 refugees a year is not enough, that's clear."
Clooney added: "We want to ask her [Angela Merkel] what we can do ... what Hollywood's involvement could be - and what the United States should be doing as well."
America has committed to accepting 10,000 Syrians this year and 85,000 refugees in total.
Refugees play a central role on and off screen at this year's festival, in a city which has seen 80,000 refugees arrive in the last year and more than a million in Germany as a whole.
When the festival was set up in 1951 there were millions of refugees and displaced people across Europe, and so from the beginning its aim was to contribute to a better understanding between nations and cultures.
Dieter Kosslick, the festival's director, said Germany felt a responsibility to do more because of its history.
"The red carpet is not just about glitz and shine, it also has something to do with responsibility .... We are in Berlin, a very specific city in history, it has to be much more acceptable in Germany to have refugees because we have a bad history."
There are more than a dozen films in the festival programme which focus on people fleeing from war and oppression.
Berlin's biggest refugee camp is at the former Templhof airport.
Built by Hitler as the gateway to Nazi Germany, more than 2000 people are now living in its huge aircraft carriers.
Many have travelled for weeks with young children from Syria, Iraq, Iran and Afghanistan.
This year's festival will organise donations to charities working with refugees, as well as supplying some with tickets to film screenings.
Angela Meyenburg, from charity KulturLeben, said she hoped refugees would enjoy the festival "to forget for some two or three hours the things you're always thinking on, or to have fun for a little while and to relax".

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Triple Murder Suspect Being Extradited To UK

12 February

The man accused of murdering a former EastEnders actress and her two sons is returning to the UK today after being extradited from Ghana.

Metropolitan Police officers have been involved in escorting Arthur Simpson-Kent on a British Airways flight from Accra to the UK, Sky News has learned.
They arrived in Ghana on Tuesday following his arrest by local police.
The 48-year-old hairdresser is accused of killing Sian Blake and her two children, Zachary, eight, and Amon, four.
Their bodies were discovered in the garden of the family home in Erith, Kent in early January, some three weeks after they were reported missing.
All three were found to have died of head and neck injuries.
Simpson-Kent was interviewed by police when the three disappeared, before fleeing to Ghana.
He agreed to be extradited after the British High Commission submitted a 200-page deposition to the authorities there.
It included CCTV of Simpson-Kent at his home in London after the murders and details of ATM withdrawals.
He was also captured on CCTV arriving in Ghana.
Ms Blake had motor neurone disease - a fatal, rapidly progressing illness which affects the brain and spinal cord - and had reportedly been in a frail state before her disappearance.
She played soul singer Frankie in EastEnders in 1996, appearing in 56 episodes.

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