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E.coli outbreak: Public warned not to eat specific product recalled as 'precautionary measure'

17 June

A third company has begun a recall over fears of possible E.coli contamination - with customers being urged to avoid eating a specific product.

Vegan chicken and bacon wraps sold only at WHSmith have been pulled from the shelves, and anyone who purchased them can return to the store for a full refund.
THIS - the food manufacturer that makes it - said the recall applies to all wraps bought up to and including Tuesday 18 June.
While no E.coli has been found in the product, the company explained this is a "precautionary measure" in case ingredients are contaminated.
Health officials have been working to track down the source of the current E.coli outbreak, as this particular strain can make people very ill.
The latest figures show 211 cases have been confirmed as of 11 June - and at least 67 people have required hospital treatment.
Last week, two other manufacturers recalled a variety of sandwiches, wraps and salads sold in major British supermarkets.
You can find a list of products affected by that recall here.
Greencore Group says it "adheres to the highest standards of food safety", adding: "We are working closely with the Food Standards Agency and our suppliers to better understand the possible source of any potential issue."
Samworth Brothers Manton Wood explained the supplier of a salad ingredient it uses in a small number of products had been advised to undertake a product withdrawal and recall.
"A small number of sandwich and wrap lines that are made at our Manton Wood site are being recalled as a precautionary measure to ensure a high level of health protection for consumers. No other Manton Wood products are affected," a spokesperson added.
Read more: What are the warning signs? Everything you need to know
E.coli bacteria are normally harmless and live in the intestines of humans and animals - but this strain is known as Shiga toxin-producing E.coli, or STEC for short.
Which? head of consumer protection policy Sue Davies told Sky News: "The FSA and UK Health Security Agency must get to the bottom of how this widespread outbreak has happened and take all action necessary to prevent any more people from becoming ill. It shows how we can never afford to be complacent with our food safety and food standards."
Trish Mannes from the UK Health Security Agency says symptoms can include "severe and sometimes bloody diarrhoea, stomach cramps, vomiting and fever".
Some cases cause serious complications that can lead to kidney failure.
People are being advised to follow NHS.uk guidance if they become unwell.
"Washing your hands with soap and warm water and using disinfectants to clean surfaces will help stop any further spread of infection," Ms Mannes added.
People who might be infected also should not prepare food for others and avoid work or school until 48 hours after symptoms stop.

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Alan Hansen: Former teammate Graeme Souness gives positive update on Liverpool legend

17 June

Former Scottish footballer Graeme Souness said he has spoken to former Liverpool captain and TV pundit Alan Hansen who is recovering in hospital. 

Hansen, 68, who captained the Reds for four seasons, has been in hospital since around 9 June, after the club confirmed he was "seriously ill".
On Monday, his friend and former teammate Souness said he thought Hansen was "on his way back" after he "took the mick" out of him from his hospital bed during a phone call.
"I spoke to him yesterday, and he sounded fabulous, so I hope he's on the way to a full recovery," Souness told the talkSPORT podcast Outspoken with White and Jordan.
"He's definitely on the way back because he did nothing but take the mick out of me, so he's definitely on the way back."
Souness, who played with Hansen at Liverpool between 1978 and 1984, said he had been calling his friend's phone and had been in regular contact with his son and wife, when he got a call from the man himself.
"I get on the train yesterday and I'm looking for my seat, and my phone rang and I could see it was Big Al," Souness, who is currently in Germany covering the Euros 2024, said.
"I'm thinking, 'Oh. I don't want to answer that,' so I sat down and then I got the courage to phone back and he answered the phone.
"He's been in a difficult place, but the way he sounded yesterday, he's back, and I hope I'm right."
It is still unknown why Hansen was hospitalised.
Read more from Sky News:
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Sir Rod Stewart 'booed' by German crowd

Hansen and Souness also represented Scotland together, with 26 appearances and 54 caps for their country, respectively.
The news of Hansen's poor health came as a shock to the football world, with the club sending "thoughts and support" to its "legendary former captain".
In a statement last week, the Merseyside club said: "The club is currently in contact with Alan's family to provide our support at this difficult time, and our thoughts, wishes and hopes are with Alan and all of the Hansen family.
"We will provide any further updates as we receive them in due course, and we request that the Hansen family's privacy is respected at this time."
Hansen's former Match Of The Day colleague Gary Lineker wrote on X after the announcement: "Horrendous news. Thoughts are with Alan, Janet and all the family."

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Breakthrough means painful, giant moles that develop in rare condition CMN could be reversed

17 June

A new genetic therapy has been developed that could reverse giant, debilitating moles that accompany a rare skin condition.

Congenital melanocytic naevus syndrome, or CMN for short, sees children born with up to 80% of their body covered in big, painful or itchy moles.
They are caused by genetic mutations acquired in the womb - and in some cases, these moles can develop into melanoma.
During trials in mice with CMNS, researchers silenced a gene called NRAS, which triggered the mole cells to self-destruct.
The treatment could one day be used to reverse the giant moles seen in CMN patients, and potentially more common types of moles.
Veronica Kinsler, who led the research, said: "CMN is physically and mentally challenging for children and adults living with this condition and for their families.
"These results are very exciting, as not only does the genetic therapy trigger self-destruction of the mole cells in the lab, but we have managed to deliver it into the skin in mice."
She cautioned that more testing is required before the therapy can be given to patients - but it is hoped clinical trials involving people will begin soon.
The study was carried out by researchers from the Francis Crick Institute, UCL Great Ormond Street Institute for Child Health, and Great Ormond Street Hospital for Children.
It was partly funded by Caring Matters Now, a charity devoted to supporting people with CMN - and its CEO has described the results as a breakthrough that could transform lives.
Jodi Whitehouse said: "Speaking as someone who was born with CMN covering 70% of my body and having undergone more than 30 operations in my childhood to try and remove the CMN because of the fear of melanoma, with no success, this news is awe inspiring and exciting. It brings real hope to the lives of those living with CMN."
Read more from Sky News:
Rod Stewart 'booed' by German crowd
New product recalled over E.coli fears
Update on Alan Hansen's condition

Hope for families
Skin cells from children born with CMN were used in the study after being donated by their parents.
One of them is Hanna, a seven-year-old born with a dark lesion covering her back, stomach and thighs.
It leaves her skin itchy and dry, with large lumpy nodules that make sleeping at night difficult and everyday life challenging.
Ada, who is three years old, has 70% of her body covered in CMN - mostly on her neck and back.
She loves swimming and the sea, but needs to take extra precautions including additional sun protection and good clothing.
Her CMN is also itchy and painful, and she has previously undergone surgery to remove concerning nodules.
Rachelle and Greg, Ada's parents, said: "Knowing there has been a huge step forward in the CMN research and there could be a chance of Ada's CMN being reversed and possibly reducing Ada's risk of developing melanoma, has blown our expectations out the water."

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Sir Rod Stewart defends support for Ukraine after being 'booed' by German crowd

17 June

Sir Rod Stewart has defended his support for Ukraine after he appeared to be booed as photos of President Volodymyr Zelenskyy were shown at a concert in Germany.

The 79-year-old was met with loud boos, shouts and whistles from the crowd in Leipzig's Quarterback Immobilien Arena on Friday, before performing his 1991 hit Rhythm Of My Heart - which he calls a war song and has dedicated to Kyiv in recent shows.
Sir Rod then saluted the Ukrainian leader, while images of President Zelenskyy and the Ukrainian flag were projected on screen.
Ukraine war latest: Huge explosion reported in Russian city
Reacting to the jeers from the crowd on Monday, Sir Rob said he has supported the Ukrainian people since Russia invaded the country in February 2022.
“From arranging for members of my family to take supplies to the country, to renting a house in the UK for a Ukrainian family, as well as employing two Ukrainians as part of my touring crew,” he said.
“So yes, I do support Zelenskyy and the people of Ukraine, and I will continue to do so.
“Putin must be stopped.”
Read more from Sky News:
Public warned not to eat specific products
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The singer ended the statement by saying he is having “the time of my life playing for German audiences, sharing some special memories” and is looking forward to playing his remaining dates there.
Sir Rod has regularly condemned Russia, and recently called Vladimir Putin an "arsehole" during an interview with Sky News.
He is due to return to Germany for a show at Hamburg's Barclays Arena later this week, before performing in Cologne on 25 June and Munich on 28 June.

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Man jailed for murder after luring former teacher to flat using dating app

17 June

A man has been sentenced to a minimum of 22 years in jail for the murder of a former Fettes College biology teacher in a catfishing plot.

Paul McNaughton admitted to luring 75-year-old Peter Coshan to a flat in Leith using a fake profile on a gay dating app in August 2022 before killing him.
McNaughton, along with his 65-year-old flatmate Paul Black, then concealed the body for days before dumping it in a layby in Northumberland.
The 29-year-old was sentenced to life imprisonment at Glasgow High Court on Monday.
Black, who was cleared of murder by a jury at Edinburgh High Court, was sentenced to a minimum of five and a half years in jail after he admitted attempting to pervert the course of justice.
McNaughton first met the retired biology teacher online in 2021 and began to steal tens of thousands of pounds from him after gaining access to his bank accounts.
Earlier, the court heard this included £38,000 in September 2021 and a further £32,000 in June the following year.
When Mr Coshan found out about the thefts, he threatened to go to the police unless McNaughton provided him with free sexual favours.
McNaughton then hatched a plot to kill the retired teacher after becoming "fed up" with the situation.
Following the killing, which happened on either 11 or 12 August 2022, the pair hid the body under a bed while they went to a fun fair at Burntisland in Fife and went on a spending spree with Mr Coshan's bank cards.
On about 15 August, they put the body in a suitcase and drove it to a layby on the A696 between Otterburn and Belsay, dumping it next to a wall.
McNaughton, who admitted murder and attempting to pervert the course of justice in 2023 before Black's trial, was sentenced to life imprisonment with a recommendation that he serve a minimum of 22 years.
McNaughton and Black showed no emotion as they were led out the dock in handcuffs.
Judge Lord Scott said it was made "clear" to him during Black's trial Mr Coshan was "a loved brother, uncle and friend" to those who knew him.
Mr Coshan had been diagnosed with Parkinson's in his latter years, the judge added, and said McNaughton "exploited" the former teacher's health before he "decided he must die".
"Having exploited Peter Coshan in life, you continued to do so in his death," he told McNaughton.
"His family did not know and may never know what happened in their loved one's final moments."
Read more:
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Mr Coshan's family said they are "horrified" anybody could have "treated a vulnerable 75-year-old in such a despicable manner".
In a statement issued through police at the end of the trial, they said: "Our life will never be the same and we will always ask the question, what if?
"There is, of course, no answer to what if, as events have overtaken us and there is no going back in time.
"However, we have happy memories of Peter and can reflect on the positive impact he had on so many people's lives."

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