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Harry: Paparazzi chased Princess Diana then photographed her dying

22 August

Prince Harry has criticised the paparazzi for taking pictures of his mother dying in a car instead of trying to help her following the crash in Paris 20 years ago.

To mark the 20th anniversary of her death, Prince Harry and his brother Prince William have spoken more openly than ever before about the events surrounding the car crash.
In a new BBC documentary, called Diana, 7 Days, Harry describes his feelings about the accident scene for the first time.
He says: "I think one of the hardest things to come to terms with is the fact that the people that chased her through into the tunnel were the same people that were taking photographs of her, while she was still dying on the back seat of the car."
He adds: "William and I know that, we've been told that numerous times by people that know that was the case.
"She'd had a... quite a severe head injury, but she was very much still alive on the back seat, and those people that... that caused the accident, instead of helping, were taking photographs of her dying on the back seat. And then those photographs made... made their way back to news desks in this country."
In the programme due to be shown on BBC1 at 7.30pm on Sunday, the two Princes also reflect on the support they received while they were in Scotland with Prince Charles and the Queen after their mother's death.
Prince Harry pays tribute to his father for his support at the time, saying: "One of the hardest things for a parent to have to do is to tell your children that your other parent has died.
"How you deal with that I don't know but, you know, he was there for us.
"He was the one, out of two, left and he tried to do his best and to make sure we were protected and looked after. But, you know, he was going through the same grieving process as well."
The Queen was criticised for not returning from Balmoral to London quickly enough to acknowledge the national outpouring of grief.
But Prince William appears to defend her decision saying: "At the time, you know, my grandmother wanted to protect her two grandsons and my father as well.
"Our grandmother deliberately removed the newspapers and things like that, so there was nothing in the house at all, so we didn't know what was going on.
"We had the privacy to mourn and kind of collect our thoughts and to try and just have that space away from everybody."
At the time of Diana's death, as the world looked for someone to blame, the behaviour of the paparazzi on that night was severely criticised.
Photographers had pursued Diana and Dodi al Fayed as they left the Ritz hotel in Paris.
An inquest held in 2007 and 2008 concluded that they were unlawfully killed due to the "gross negligence" of driver Henri Paul, who had been drinking, and the paparazzi who were following the car.
In a Sky documentary, Jack and Robin Firestone, an American couple who were on holiday in Paris with their 12-year old son, talk about seeing the group of photographers after the taxi they were in ended up in the Pont de l'Alma tunnel.
In the programme Robin recalls seeing the paparazzi surrounding the car.
He says: "Before we got to the point where we were right next to the pillars, we were going so slowly and I noticed several different people with cameras.
"There's red lights, there's blue lights, there's white lights from these photographers. The best way to explain it was a splash of light; blinding, blinding lights, and you hear the clicks."
She also describes her shock that no one was helping, saying: "I see a woman's face. Her head was turned. She had blonde hair.
"And I said: 'Oh my god there's a woman in the car and it looks like she's got to be dead. What are they doing? Why aren't they helping? Why are they taking pictures?'"
:: Diana: The People's Princess will be shown on Sky News at 3pm and 8pm on Wednesday.

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Two charged over Spain terror attacks as suspect is released

22 August

One of the surviving suspects of last week's terror attacks in Spain has told a court that a bigger atrocity was planned.

According to Spanish newspaper El Mundo, Mohamed Houli Chemlal revealed the cell was planning to strike some of Barcelona's best-known monuments - including the Sagrada Familia church.
The 21-year-old was among four men who appeared at Madrid's National Court to testify for the first time about the plot.
According to public broadcaster RTVE, a Spanish judge made these rulings after the hearing:
:: Two of the suspects - Mohamed Houli Chemlal and Driss Oukabir - will be charged with murder, membership of a terror organisation and the possession of explosives. They are being held in prison without bail
:: A third suspect, Salah el Karib, will be detained for another 72 hours while he is investigated further
:: The fourth, Mohammed Aalla, will be released on bail because the evidence against him is weak.
Chemlal was arrested after being injured in an explosion at a house in Alcanar, southwest of Barcelona, a day before a van drove into pedestrians on the crowded Las Ramblas boulevard.
Officials believe bombs were being prepared at that property for "one or more attacks in Barcelona" - and the explosion killed an imam who is thought to have radicalised the other suspects.
Two of the suspects in court said the imam, Abdelbaki es Satty, was the instigator of the plot - and it has been claimed he was planning a suicide attack in the city.
A Spanish judge has said a plane ticket to Brussels which belonged to es Satty was found in the house flattened by the explosion - as well as an Islamic State document.
Police said 120 gas canisters and traces of explosive TATP were found at the Alcanar house.
The suspects who appeared in court are believed to be the only surviving members of a 12-man terror cell.
Oukabir was also questioned during the hearing. Although he told prosecutors he had rented the van used in the Las Ramblas attack, he said he believed it was going to be used for a house move.
Chemlal has confessed to his participation in the Islamist cell behind the attack, but the other three had said they were innocent.
Fifteen people were killed and 120 others wounded in last week's attacks.
Court documents have also released that knives and an axe had been bought by some of the terror suspects only minutes before the second attack in Cambrils.
Younes Abouyaaquob, who is suspected of driving the van through crowds of tourists on Las Ramblas, was shot dead by police on Monday.
Oukabir's younger brother, Moussa, was among the five suspected terrorists killed in a shootout with police in Cambrils early on Friday morning.

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Protests expected at Trump rally in Phoenix

23 August

Thousands of people in the US city of Phoenix are expected to welcome the US president with protests as he arrives for a rally later.

Donald Trump will hold the rally a day after his primetime speech outlining his strategy for Afghanistan but it is mainly his handling of events in Charlottesville that are firing up the protesters.
Mr Trump was criticised for failing to denounce white supremacists who had clashed with anti-fascist protesters earlier this month.
The protests resulted in the death of a woman and injury to dozens of other people.
By Tuesday, various groups had gathered the support of thousands of people wiling to protest in the Arizona city.
Among these were more than 4,300 people saying they would join one event - Protest Trump Downtown Phoenix -opposite the convention centre where Mr Trump is due to speak.
Other protests included White Supremacy Will Not Be Pardoned and Never Again: Jews and Allies Against Hate.
Reports said there was already a crowd of Trump supporters and a heavy police presence.
Phoenix's mayor Greg Stanton wrote in the Washington Post on Monday urging Mr Trump to delay his trip.
The Democrat wrote: "America is hurting and it is hurting largely because Trump has doused racial tensions with gasoline. With his planned visit to Phoenix on Tuesday, I fear the president may be looking to light a match.
"It's time to let cooler heads prevail and begin the healing process," he wrote before adding that he was "not optimistic (that) the White House will heed that call".
Arizona's Governor Doug Ducey, a Republican, is planning to greet Mr Trump but will not be at the rally, according to the Arizona Republic.
The state's two Republican senators John McCain and Jeff Flake will also be absent from the rally.
Mr Trump won Arizona in last year's election but it was a narrow victory: 48.1% compared with 44.6% won by Hillary Clinton.

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'Corruption hub' Ukraine could offer terror route to Europe for Russian IS fighters

22 August

The village of Karata clings precariously to the walls of a river valley in the Russian state of Dagestan.

It is a picturesque spot and we watched as residents worked and prayed and tended to verdant gardens, cut from the sides of the surrounding mountains.
But there is one patch in this community that has clearly gone to seed.
It belongs to a pensioner called Kazim Nurmagomedov and he has not really touched it in the past three years.
Instead he was busy dealing with a family tragedy - a series of traumatic events that began when his youngest son Marat went to Syria to join so-called Islamic State.
Mr Nurmagomedov said it came as a terrible shock.
Marat was married, his wife was pregnant and he was financially comfortable as well. It did not seem to make any sense.
"The first few days I was honestly, in total shock. My wife and I didn't know what to do. The first thing we tried was simply contacting him although we didn't own a smartphone at the time. When I reached him, my first question was, why did you do this?"
This sense of bewilderment was not Mr Nurmagomedov's alone.
It was a common feeling in fact, after 30 residents left Karata to join IS in Syria. The authorities did little - but the 62-year-old former businessman took a different approach.
He decided he would go to Syria himself and track his son down.
"Even if I was 80-years-old I would have done the same. It was an emotional thing to do. I needed to understand what he had done."
In 2013 he slipped into Syria and found his youngest son training with other jihadists in Aleppo. He then tried to persuade Marat and the rest of the unit - to go home.
"I couldn't change (my son's) mind during my week in Syria. He's is not like a computer, he is a human being. They were all convinced that they were doing the right thing, ready to die for Allah and jihad. I could see it in their eyes."
Mr Nurmagomedov went back to Russia - but he did not give up. Using the Whatsapp messenger on his brand new smartphone, he persuaded his son to leave by reminding him of his wife and child.
That was his "weak point" remarked Kazim.
Still, it took another two years to come up with a plan to smuggle Marat out.
"I devoted all my time to it, meeting people, travelling back and forth, to Turkey, four months in Egypt, Moscow many times. Although I was dreaming of coming here to plant vegetables and flowers with my wife."
Marat managed to escape with his father's help but he has not returned to Russia.
Instead, he is living in the shadows, in a rundown spot in southern Ukraine - and we met the softly-spoken 33-year-old in his spartan-looking bedsit.
He told me he could not go home.
"I am a wanted man in Russia and I will be immediately jailed. In Dagestan, the intelligence services are cruel and tough and there are cases where they killed people or tortured them to death."
You can find Marat Nurmagomedov's name is on the Russian government's 'active terrorist list' - number 5035 to be exact - but the bespectacled ex-jihadi says he does not pose a threat to anyone.
"No, of course not. I am not dangerous. It's against my beliefs. Now, I now understand these people are mistaken and they will go to hell," he says.

He is not the only former fighter holed up in Ukraine. Community activists and analysts told us that there are 400 to 500 ex-jihadists from Syria and Iraq in hiding there.
The majority it's thought are Russian-speakers from Russia or Central Asian states. They make their way to Ukraine because they are able to communicate and make arrangements to move on.
"They come here to get passports - Ukraine is a corruption hub," says writer and columnist Ekaterina Sergatskova.
"If you have real Ukrainian passport then you can then get a biometric passport and you can move to Europe."
Earlier this month, Ukraine inked a visa-free travel deal with the European Union which allows its citizens to visit most European countries for up to 90 days.
Ukraine's old-style paper passport has been upgraded, but critics like Ms Sergatskova argue that you can still get a fake one for a couple of thousand dollars from a battalion of corrupt civil servants.
In response, the State Migration Service told Sky News that the new biometric passport features mean that "massive illegal documentation is almost impossible".
Kazim Nurmagomedov accepts that his youngest son will not return to Karata, and at the moment he is simply trying to keep him out of jail. But that is not the only problem he is dealing with.
The second of his three sons, Shamil Nurmagomedov has spent the past six months in a Russian prison on suspicion of financing terrorism after he sent Marat 200,000 roubles (£2,640) by bank transfer in 2013.
Shamil - who is 5041 on the government's terror list - is currently awaiting trial.
Certainly, Kazim's desire to spend time in the garden will remain the stuff of fantasy.
When he is not trying to look after his family, he fields calls from desperate mothers and fathers busy searching for their own children.
In fact we were with him when one couple walked down his overgrown driveway to see him.
Their son left for IS last year and they had not heard from him for months.
The anxious looking pair were hoping the 62-year-old pensioner could provide some contacts and advice, but there was little he could say.
"I am afraid the chances are low," he told me. "I didn't want to say it out loud but there is little hope. If they can't get in contact for a few months he is probably dead."

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Kim Wall: Limbs 'deliberately cut off' headless torso found near Copenhagen

22 August

Danish police have said the headless torso of a woman found floating in waters south of Copenhagen had been deliberately mutilated.

Officers are searching for Swedish journalist Kim Wall, who has not been seen since she was spotted on a 60ft homemade submarine on 10 August.
A torso missing its head and limbs was discovered in Koge Bay on Monday and DNA is being compared to genetic material from relatives of Ms Wall, 30.
Police investigator Jens Moeller Jensen said the arms and legs had "deliberately been cut off".
He said: "We do not know yet whether it is her or not.
"The length of the torso means we cannot rule out that it could be Kim Wall, but we don't know yet."
The results of the DNA testing are expected on Wednesday.
Danish inventor Peter Madsen has been accused of the negligent manslaughter of the 30-year-old journalist - but denies any wrongdoing.
:: Kim Wall disappearance: What we know so far
He initially told authorities he dropped Ms Wall off on an island later on the evening of 10 August.
But he then changed his story days later when he appeared in court, saying she died in an accident on board and he dumped her body at sea in an undefined location in Koge Bay.
Search crews found the missing sub Nautilus on 11 August and Madsen was recovered from the vessel, alone, just before it sank.
Police have said they believe Madsen "deliberately" sank the submarine. It was raised to the surface and searched, but found to be empty.
Ms Wall was a freelance journalist who had met with Madsen to interview him for a feature story she was writing.
The pair were seen onboard the Nautilus by several people in waters off Copenhagen on the evening of 10 August.

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