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THE NEWS SERVICE HEARD BY 26 MILLION LISTENERS TO COMMERCIAL RADIO IN THE UK [READ MORE]

Established in 1973 at the birth of commercial radio in the UK, IRN provides client stations with a continuous service of national and international news. The service comprises a ready to air hourly news bulletin, delivered live 24/7, in addition to a suite of pre-recorded news content in the form of news audio cuts on the main stories, written cues and scripts to help stations produce their own bulletins, plus plenty of extra material within sports news, showbiz and music news, money news and consumer technology news.

Top Stories

HIV Clinic 'Screwed Up' By Releasing Names

02 September

The names of hundreds of people who use HIV services were released by accident after a message with their email addresses on was sent to the others.

Alan McOwan, Chelsea and Westminster Hospital NHS Trust's director for sexual health, has told Sky News that processes have been put in place that mean it should not happen again.
He said: "Hands up. We really screwed up here and we need to get it right."
He said it was important to remember that not everyone on the list was HIV positive.
An investigation is under way into why the 56 Dean Street clinic, which is part of the Chelsea and Westminster NHS trust, sent out a newsletter to patients on a group email, rather than to individuals.
A spokesman for the clinic, which is in London's Soho, said the mistake was caused by "human error".
He said: "We can confirm that due to an administrative error, a newsletter about services at 56 Dean Street was sent to an email group rather than individual recipients.
"We have immediately contacted all the email recipients to inform them of the error and apologise."
Online magazine beyondpositive, which provides a forum for people who have the virus, said it had been contacted by patients about the data breach.
It was told that the clinic tried to rectify its mistake by using Microsoft Outlook's recall feature, but the full list of email addresses and names was sent out a second time.
One reader told the magazine: "This is serious breach of data protection. There are several names I recognise from the list and while I am of course being discreet, I am not sure I trust every other person on the list to do the same."
The Information Commissioner's Officer said in a tweet that it was aware of the breach and was "making enquiries".
The newsletter was sent to about 780 patients who were part of the clinic's OptionE service. It is designed to make it easy for people to book appointments and receive test results by email.
Mr McOwan said the error occurred when someone wrote the email addresses in the email's CC bar when sending the newsletter, rather than the BCC bar, which would have shielded the addresses from other recipients.
When asked by Sky News what had happened to the person who pressed "send", he said they had been sent home.
"Clearly they are absolutely distraught. We didn't feel that this is the right place for them to be right now so they are being supported away from the work environment while we sort this out," he said.
He said a blanket ban on similar types of communication had been put in place and he wanted to reassure everyone that they would learn lessons for the future.
"We've got to get it right here because clearly, confidentiality is key in people trusting us to provide the care they need," he added.
"Our challenge is to build trust back with our community. Twelve and a half thousand people use our service every month and we take great steps to protect those people, which is why this is such a huge thing for us and why we want to be so open about what we are doing to put it right."
Anyone worried about the breach is urged to phone 020 3315 9555.

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Shocking Image Shows Syrian Boy's Drowned Body

02 September

Distressing footage has been released which shows the washed-up body of a Syrian boy on a Turkish beach.

It is believed the child drowned as he travelled in an inflatable boat to the Greek island of Kos, and officials are seen tending to him as he lies face down in the sand.
A policeman cradles the boy’s body and takes him away from the scene.
His body was found in Bodrum - the popular resort in southwest Turkey.
The pictures were tweeted by journalist Sakir Khader, who wrote: "He survived the violence of the Syrian war, but died on his way to a new peaceful life in Europe."
According to Turkish media, the three-year-old boy was called Aylan Kurdi. He and his family had travelled from the Syrian town of Kobani, where Islamic State has been involved in heavy fighting in recent months.
Sixteen people were on the dinghy when it sank, the Dogan news agency reported, and Aylan's five-year-old brother also drowned.
In total, at least 11 refugees are confirmed to have died, and others are missing.
Many of those who lost their lives had to be pulled out of the water by locals. A mother and three children were among those killed.
Thousands of refugees have made the same perilous journey in recent months after arriving in Turkey from war-torn countries including Syria, Iraq and Afghanistan.
According to one aid agency, about 2,000 people attempt to make the short but dangerous crossing to Greece’s eastern islands in unsafe vessels every day.
Those who make it to Greece then travel through the Balkan states of Macedonia and Serbia – countries which have been overwhelmed by the exodus.
They are attempting to reach Hungary, but the EU member state has erected a temporary razor-wire fence to control the flow of refugees and economic migrants.
As a result, there are fears that dangerous bottlenecks could form along the border that Hungary shares with Serbia.

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Angry Migrants Stranded In Hungary Stage Protest

02 September

Hundreds of migrants stranded in Hungary are protesting outside a train station after police stopped them boarding trains to Germany for a second day.

About 3,000 people are outside Keleti station in Budapest, the Hungarian capital's main international railway station.
Many of them spent the night sleeping outside the entrance, guarded by police.
But a government spokesman said: "In the territory of the EU, illegal migrants can travel onwards only with valid documents and observing EU rules. A train ticket does not overwrite EU rules."
The ongoing rallies outside the terminal came as Italy, France and Germany signed a joint document calling for current EU rules on granting asylum to be revised - allowing for a "fair" distribution of migrants and refugees between member states.
Berlin has been especially vocal in calling for a "strong response to the crisis", as Germany is expecting to receive 800,000 asylum seekers this year.
This could prove problematic for David Cameron, as Britain has only committed to take 500 Syrian refugees.
One German politician has suggested his government's stance on the migration crisis could affect renegotiations on Britain's relationship with the EU.
Luxembourg has pledged to unveil new policies which would make it easier to distribute refugees among the 28 nations in its bloc, and Jean-Claude Juncker is set to make a "state of the union" address to the European Parliament next week.
Although the EU is committed to the principle of homing refugees who are fleeing real danger, there is no mechanism to compel member states to accept them in equal numbers.
Meanwhile, the number of Syrian refugees who are travelling to the EU via Turkey, Greece and the Balkans shows no sign of abating.
On Wednesday, pictures showed the washed-up body of a Syrian boy on a Turkish beach in Bodrum after the inflatable boat he was travelling in capsized.
Greek authorities, which have been overwhelmed by the number of migrants and refugees arriving on its shores, has asked for greater support from EU partners in processing their claims for asylum. Italy and Hungary have done the same.
Hungarian police have said they intend to reinforce their positions outside the station in Budapest as the volume of migrants arriving from Serbia continues to grow.
Officers are working with colleagues in Austria, Germany and Slovakia to search for migrants travelling illegally on Hungarian trains.
On Tuesday, police forced hundreds of migrants outside the terminal as the government temporarily suspended all rail traffic there.
It marks a U-turn for Hungary, which over the weekend started to allow migrants to travel by train to western Europe without going through asylum procedures.
The closure of the station appeared prompted in part by pressure from other EU nations trying to cope with the influx of thousands of migrants flowing through Hungary.
Trainloads of migrants arrived in Austria and Germany from Hungary on Monday as asylum rules collapsed under the strain of a wave of migration unprecedented in the EU.
More than 150,000 migrants have travelled this year to the country - the gateway to the EU for those crossing by land from nations including Syria and Afghanistan, across Macedonia and Serbia.
Army engineers have begun building a 4m-high fence along the border with non-EU member Serbia in an attempt to control the problem.
The country's foreign minister has said the government plans to register all refugees, but added economic migrants will be sent back to the state from which they entered Hungary.
The clampdown in Hungary appears to have had an immediate effect.
German police said only 50 migrants arrived on the morning trains into Munich, compared to 2,400 on Tuesday.
The border town of Rosenheim received no more than 70 migrants on Wednesday, compared to 300 the day before.

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Backpacker Accused: I Was Tortured Naked

02 September

One of the men accused of killing two British tourists in Thailand claims he was stripped naked, beaten and threatened with having his teeth pulled out or being killed at sea.

Burmese migrant worker Zaw Lin, 22, claims police also tried to extract a confession by blindfolding him and suffocating him with plastic bags until he collapsed.
He and co-accused Wei Phyo are alleged to have murdered Hannah Witheridge, 23, and David Miller, 24, on 14 September last year on the island of Koh Tao.
International human rights observers at trial say allegations of police abuse would constitute torture if true. 
Zaw Lin told the court in neighbouring Koh Samui how he was woken in the early hours of 2 October, 2014, to find 10 men gathered in the dormitory he shared with other workers.
"They kicked me in the face with their feet and slapped me around the head. They kept asking me "Did you kill?" and when I said no they hit me again," Zaw Lin told the court.
During the interrogation in early October last year, two weeks after the bodies were found on a beach, Zaw Lin said they put him on the telephone to his co-accused, Wei Phyo, also 22, who told him: "They almost killed me. I am almost dying."
Both men claim they eventually confessed to the rape and murder of Ms Witheridge and the bludgeoning to death of David Miller, after being told they would only go to prison for four or five years.
Kingsley Abbott of the International Commission of Jurists, along with other human rights lawyers, sat through the 10 hours of testimony on Wednesday.
Mr Abbot said afterwards: "Based on what we heard today, that he was stripped naked, had plastic bags placed over his head, blindfolded and made to fear for his life in order to extract a confession, it is very likely to meet the definition of torture as defined by the Convention Against Torture, to which Thailand is a party."
He added: "Today's allegations must be subject to a serious enquiry by the court and if proven, any evidence obtained as a result of the torture must be set aside."
Both men retracted their confessions several weeks later when they were eventually given access to lawyers, and they have maintained their innocence ever since.
A former cellmate in Koh Samui prison, and the prison doctor, both testified to seeing wounds and injuries on both the accused after their interrogation.
Zaw Lin's mother was in court to listen to the allegations by her son.
As he went into detail about the abuse he claimed he had suffered she had to leave the court and vomited outside.
The parents of David Miller were also in court. They spoke to Sky News and said they were happy to be able to listen to the proceedings first hand.
"We spoke to David just six hours before he died and he was so happy. He said he absolutely loved the place and it was so beautiful and he was full of his trip," his mother, Sue Miller, said.
Zaw Lin said he and two friends had been on the same beach as the victims in the early hours of 15 September. 
They had bought beer and cigarettes and were playing their guitar about 60m from where the bodies were found at dawn.
But Lin said they had simply had a swim in the sea at about 2am before going home to bed.
The third man was not arrested with Zaw Lin and Wei Phyo, and police investigators told the court they have since "lost contact with him".
The trial continues.

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Poroshenko Blames Russia For Police Deaths

02 September

Ukraine's president has laid the blame for the murder of three policemen during a right wing demonstration on Monday firmly at the doors of the Kremlin, accusing Russia of extending its "campaign of destabilisation".

Three people died after grenades were thrown during clashes between nationalists and police outside Ukraine's parliament.
It followed a vote to give more powers to the regions, including separatist regions in the east.
Petro Poroshenko, a billionaire businessman who was elected in May last year at the height of a Russian campaign to seize the Crimea and back rebels in the east of Ukraine, told Sky News the killings were inspired by Moscow.
In an exclusive and wide-ranging interview, he insisted that his reform programme to bring his country closer to European Union norms and requirements was on track, notably tackling corruption and the planned lifting of immunity for politicians - including himself.
Part of his business empire was built on confectionery - as a result he is known as the "chocolate king".
But it is the tsar-like leadership of Vladimir Putin that he says is a threat not only to his country but to wider European and global security - pointing out that even the UK regularly has Russian military aircraft testing its air space.
He said that Russia had become "unpredictable" but he did not feel vulnerable, even though "this is one of the most difficult presidencies in the whole world".
His claim that Russia may have been behind the grenade attack on the police will gain credence among conspiracy theorists and some military theorists. Moscow has pioneered what is now known as "hybrid warfare" – the use of covert operators to foment instability.
Ukraine's president said he was proud of his country's ability to hold back the Russians and rebels given that a year ago he was told that "half your army is corrupt and the other 50% are Russian agents" by NATO and other western supporters who have now begun training his forces.
Mr Poroshenko was adamant that he would also bring reforms to the country's notoriously corrupt economy, insisting that constitutional reforms lifting immunity from parliamentarians and the judiciary would be driven on - even in the face of the very politicians who may soon come under investigation by newly foreign trained anti-corruption detectives.
"War is not an excuse to stop reforms," he said.
His hopes are most pinned on a ceasefire agreement that was signed many months ago but has only seen respect in the last six days, with no serious casualties reported from the front line.
"The only reason that the Russians came to Minsk and are prepared to negotiate at all was as a result of economic sanctions imposed by the outside world," he said, insisting that Ukraine did not need troops but it would continue to need the support of the international community.
He is forging ahead with plans to move yet further away from the Kremlin's influence and closer to the European Union – precisely the policy that has so angered Vladimir Putin, the Russian president. So it is hard to see an end to Ukraine's conflict any time soon.

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