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Police officer shot dead inside custody centre in south London

25 September

A police officer has been shot dead inside a custody centre in south London.

The Metropolitan Police say a 23-year-old man was detained at the scene at Croydon custody centre, and was taken to hospital with a gunshot wound.
The male officer, who Sky News understands is married with children, was shot at 2.15am on Friday by a man who had already been arrested.
In a statement, the Met said the officer was treated at the scene and then taken to hospital by London Ambulance Service, but later died.
No police firearms were discharged, according to the police.
Commissioner Cressida Dick said: "This is a truly shocking incident in which one of our colleagues has lost his life in the most tragic circumstances. My heart goes out to his family, direct colleagues and friends."
Sky News understands that the victim was a long-serving member of the the Met who worked as a custody sergeant at the Croydon facility.
He is believed to have been an officer for almost 30 years.
Sky crime correspondent Martin Brunt said: "As far as I can piece together , the suspect was arrested in the early hours in Croydon.
"He'd been stopped and searched by two special police constables.
"I understand that they found some ammunition - maybe only one bit of ammunition on him - so that was enough to arrest him.
"He was then put into a police car, or more likely a police van with a cage for prisoners.
"But for some reason, I'm told he wasn't hand-cuffed.
"He was brought here to Croydon, and at around two o'clock this morning, he was taken into the custody suite and put into a holding cell which is normal procedure.
"At one point, the officer who died, opened the door to the cell to do two things.
"To get personal details of the suspect, but also to go through some COVID-19 procedures, which are mandatory for anybody who's brought into the custody suite.
"And it was at that point that the weapon was produced by the suspect and fired at the officer."
Prime Minister Boris Johnson released a statement, saying: "My deepest condolences go to the family, friends and colleagues of the police officer who was killed in Croydon last night.
"We owe a huge debt to those who risk their own lives to keep us safe."
Home Secretary Priti Patel said: "I am deeply shocked and saddened to learn that a Metropolitan Police Officer has been shot and killed in the line of duty.
"My thoughts today are with his family, friends and policing colleagues in London and across the country."
Mayor of London Sadiq Khan said: "I am devastated by the news a Metropolitan Police officer has lost his life.
"I was informed of this tragic incident by the Commissioner this morning, and my heart goes out to the family of this brave officer, who has paid the ultimate price for helping to keep Londoners safe."
"My thoughts are also with his loved ones, friends and the entire Metropolitan Police family, who I know will be deeply mourning their colleague at this extremely difficult time.
"Tragic incidents like this are terrible reminders of the dangers our police officers face every single day they go into work to keep Londoners safe.
"They are the very best of us, and I remain in close contact with the Commissioner to offer her and the Met my ongoing support."
One officer has posted on Twitter saying that he responded to "the worst possible radio transmission".
Ms Patel added: "This morning I spoke to Metropolitan Police Commissioner Cressida Dick to express my condolences and to offer whatever support is needed as this tragic event is investigated.
"This is a sad day for our country and another terrible reminder of how our police officers put themselves in danger each and every day to keep the rest of us safe."
The Met are working to tell the victim's family, who are being supported by specialist officers.
Labour leader Keir Starmer said he is sending his thoughts to the family of the officer.
Commissioner Dick added: "We are currently supporting his family and also have a dedicated team providing support to the officers and those in the custody centre who witnessed the shooting.
"When a colleague dies in the line of duty the shockwaves and sadness reverberates throughout the Met and our communities. Policing is a family, within London and nationally, and we will all deeply mourn our colleague.
"We are in the early stages of the investigation and are still working to establish the circumstances surrounding the incident and we will provide further updates when we have them."
The incident has been referred to the Independent Office for Police Conduct who will investigate, although the Met will lead the murder probe.
Policing Minister Kit Malthouse made an announcement to MPs about the death.
Mr Malthouse said: "We ask our police officers to do an extraordinary job.
"The fact that one of them has fallen in the line of performing that duty is a tragedy for the entire nation.
"I know the entire House will offer their condolences to his family and friends and colleagues.
"May he rest in peace and may justice follow this heinous crime."
Commons Speaker Sir Lindsay Hoyle added: "It is shocking news. This should never happen to the people that protect us and make us safe. All our thoughts and prayers go with the family and friends and the police community."

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Princess Eugenie is pregnant, Buckingham Palace announces

25 September

Princess Eugenie and Jack Brooksbank are expecting a baby in early 2021, Buckingham Palace has announced.

The couple are said to be "very pleased".
A post from the Royal Family's account on Twitter confirmed the news and added the Queen and Duke of Edinburgh are "delighted".
And Eugenie, who is 10th in line to the throne, posted a photo of two tiny, furry slippers on her Instagram, teasing: "Jack and I are so excited for early 2021."
The baby will be a ninth great-grandchild for the Queen, following the arrival of her eighth - the Duke and Duchess of Sussex's son Archie Mountbatten-Windsor.
But Eugenie's parents, Prince Andrew and Sarah, the Duchess of York, will become grandparents for the first time.
The baby boy or girl will be born 11th in line to the throne, but will not be an HRH or hold a title.
This is because while their mother is a princess, their father has no title and so the child will be born down a female line - meaning they will be plain master or miss.
That would change if the Queen decides to intervene and give Mr Brooksbank - who is European brand manager for Casamigos Tequila, co-founded by George Clooney - an earldom or amends the rules.
Eugenie has been married to Mr Brooksbank for just under two years.
At the ceremony in October 2018, she chose to wear a wedding dress that showed her scar from childhood spinal surgery to correct scoliosis.
The operation was performed by NHS surgeon Jan Lehovsky, who was invited to attend the wedding along with representatives from the Royal National Orthopaedic Hospital NHS Trust.

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Coronavirus: Chancellor's 'live without fear' message not an invitation to break COVID-19 rules, min

25 September

A minister has denied that the chancellor's message to "live without fear" during the pandemic was a suggestion people do not have to follow the coronavirus rules.

Rishi Sunak made the remark in the Commons as he set out his "Winter Economy Plan" designed to avert a jobs crisis amid continuing COVID-19 restrictions.
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Asked about the comment in an interview on Sky News - and whether it was a message that Britons should ignore the coronavirus rules - chief secretary to the Treasury Steve Barclay said: "Quite the opposite.
"I think what's very clear from the message the chancellor said we need to address the health risks in order to protect jobs.
"It's as a consequence of people following the health guidance, adhering to that, that's also how we enable the economy to recover and we protect as many jobs as possible.
"This false choice that's sometimes presented between the health needs and the economic needs is wrong.
"They both sit side by side and it's through taking strong measures to address the virus that we can get the business confidence back into the economy."
The headline announcement from the chancellor was a new Job Support Scheme, which will replace furlough when it ends next month.
This will see the government "directly support" the wages of people in "viable" jobs working at least a third of their normal hours.
A worker doing a third of their normal hours will still get 77% of their usual pay - 33% from their employer for the hours worked, a 22% top-up from the firm and another 22% from the government (up to a cap of £697.92 a month).
It will start in November and run for six months - with all small and medium-sized businesses eligible for the scheme.
Larger firms will have to prove their profits have been affected by the pandemic in order to utilise it.
The 15% VAT cut for hospitality and tourism - down to 5% - has also been extended until the end of March.
Mr Barclay said the government have been "honest with the public that we will not be able to save, regretfully, every job".
"There's a whole range of investment going into the economy in those sectors whilst we protect as many of those jobs that are viable, that people have been protected in initially through the furlough and now through the winter package.
"It is right that we also look at the cost to the wider economy, these measures come at a significant fiscal cost, and that's why it's right we target those jobs that are viable during what is going to be sadly a difficult winter."
But Labour's shadow business minister Lucy Powell told Sky News that she fears the scheme may not have the intended effect and will still result in "mass redundancies".
"The cost to employers and the incentive to employers are not good enough," she said.
"It will be cheaper for an employer to keep somebody on full-time than it would be to keep two people on part-time.
"That's not really what the scheme is designed to do."
The SNP's Westminster leader Ian Blackford said the end of the furlough scheme will result in a "dramatic increase" in unemployment.
"We're going to return to the mass unemployment that we haven't seen since the early 1980s," he told Sky News.

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Coronavirus: Tesco starts rationing key items to prevent repeat of shortages

25 September

Tesco has said it is introducing limits on some key household essentials, just days after its chief executive appealed for no "unnecessary" panic buying as coronavirus restrictions are tightened.

The UK's largest supermarket chain revealed a three items per customer limit on flour, dried pasta, toilet roll, baby wipes and antibacterial wipes a day after 'big four' rival Morrisons introduced similar measures blaming evidence of stockpiling.
All the major supermarkets introduced temporary rationing in March after shelves were stripped bare of essentials in the weeks leading up to the COVID-19 lockdown.
They were slowly lifted as stocks recovered and stores are anxious to avert a repeat.
Tesco said its restrictions applied to all store and online sales though digital orders would also see limits on a number of additional items such as rice and canned vegetables.
"We have good availability, with plenty of stock to go round, and we would encourage our customers to shop as normal,"
a Tesco spokeswoman said on Friday.
"To ensure that everyone can keep buying what they need, we have introduced bulk-buy limits on a small number of products."
It is understood the decision was a reaction to evidence of a small uplift in demand for the goods.
Morrisons brought back limits on products such as toilet roll, disinfectants and bleach to a maximum of three.
The other members of the big four chains, Sainsbury's and Asda, are yet to impose any restrictions.
Dave Lewis, the chief executive of Tesco, sought to reassure customers on Wednesday after the prime minister told people to work from home where possible and ordered restaurants and bars to close early to tackle a spike in the pandemic.
Mr Lewis told Ian King Live: "I think the UK saw how well the food industry managed last time, so there's very good supplies of food.
"We just don't want to see a return to unnecessary panic buying because that creates a tension in the supply chain that's not necessary.
"And therefore we would just encourage customers to continue to buy as normal."

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Coronavirus: Potential vaccine passes another hurdle as Phase 3 trial set to begin in the UK

25 September

Novavax is ready to start its Phase 3 trial of an experimental COVID-19 vaccine in the UK.

The US biotechnology firm plans to enrol up to 10,000 volunteers aged between 18 and 84 over the next four to six weeks.
The company joins AstraZeneca, Pfizer, and Moderna as its vaccine candidate enters the final step of the regulatory approvals process.
Live updates on coronavirus from UK and around world
There are almost 40 potential vaccines being tested globally and more than 140 others in the early stages of testing, according to the World Health Organisation.
Half of the volunteers in the Novavax trial will have two shots of NVX-CoV2373 with Matrix-M, the company's adjuvant which is intended to strengthen the vaccine. Half will be given a placebo.
Up to 400 volunteers will get a seasonal flu vaccine and the COVID-19 vaccine to see the effectiveness of combining the two.
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At least 25% of participants will be aged over 65 and the trial will prioritise groups most affected by COVID-19, including those from ethnic minorities, the company said.
In August, the UK government announced that support and infrastructure would be given to Novavax during its Phase 3 clinical trial in the UK.
This includes plans to manufacture the vaccine in the UK and the promise of 60 million doses for the UK if the vaccine turns out to be safe and effective.
The Novavax candidate is the second vaccine to enter Phase 3 clinical trials in the UK - the first was the potential vaccine being developed by Oxford University and AstraZeneca.
Gregory M Glenn, president of research and development at Novavax, said the team was "optimistic" that the trial would "provide a near-term view" of the vaccine's efficacy.
He added: "The data from this trial is expected to support regulatory submissions for licensure in the UK, EU and other countries.
"We are grateful for the support of the UK government, including from its Department of Health and Social Care and National Institute for Health Research, to advance this important research."
Novavax said that pre-clinical trials showed the potential vaccine was "generally well-tolerated" and produced "robust antibody responses" greater than those seen in recovering patients.
Thomas Moore, Sky's science correspondent, said the Novavax trial could start as soon as Friday and that the vaccine candidate shows "huge promise".
Novavax shares were up more than 6% in after-hours trading in the US.

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