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THE NEWS SERVICE HEARD BY 26 MILLION LISTENERS TO COMMERCIAL RADIO IN THE UK [READ MORE]

Established in 1973 at the birth of commercial radio in the UK, IRN provides client stations with a continuous service of national and international news. The service comprises a ready to air hourly news bulletin, delivered live 24/7, in addition to a suite of pre-recorded news content in the form of news audio cuts on the main stories, written cues and scripts to help stations produce their own bulletins, plus plenty of extra material within sports news, showbiz and music news, money news and consumer technology news.

Top Stories

Corbyn Heckled Over EU Vote: 'It's Your Fault'

25 June

Jeremy Corbyn has been heckled at a gay pride event and told to resign over not being able to get Labour voters in Wales, the Midlands and the North to back Remain.

He was tackled by a Twitter user Tom Mauchline who posted the videos of his encounters on his feed.
As Mr Corbyn is surrounded by a group of minders, Mr Mauchline approaches him and shouts: "It's your fault Jeremy. When are you resigning? I've got a Polish friend in tears because you couldn't get out the vote in Wales, the North and the Midlands."
As Mr Corbyn avoids engaging the heckler before finally saying "I did all I could", before one of his minders steps in front and says: "It's the Murdoch press..."
But Mr Mauchline continues to ask him about resignation, shouting "You ran on a platform of mobilising ... working class votes and you failed", Mr Corbyn continues to refuse to engage and steps away.
Earlier, he said he will not stand aside if a leadership contest is held to challenge his position in the Labour Party.
When asked by Sky's Sophy Ridge if he will run again for leader in the event  a challenger comes forward, he told supporters: "Yes. I am here."
On Friday, following a performance in the campaign to support Remain that many felt was lacklustre, two senior Labour MPs submitted a no-confidence motion in their party leader.
Party insiders have said that the motion, filed by Dame Margaret Hodge and seconded by Ann Coffey, is supported by several MPs.
Labour former cabinet minister Dame Tessa Jowell has also backed the call for a vote of no confidence in Mr Corbyn.
She told Sky News Tonight: "I think it's unlikely to succeed, but the fact is at the moment we have more than nine million, at the last election, Labour voters who are largely unrepresented.
"Jeremy is very much the leader of the Labour Party - 600,000 members.
"What we have to do is to broaden the conversation that Labour has with Labour supporting people, who so desperately need a Labour government across the country and I don't think we are doing that at the moment, as the referendum showed."
Sky's Jason Farrell said Mr Corbyn is refusing to stand down because he believes he has a massive mandate due to the number of Labour members who voted for him.
A petition in support of Mr Corbyn has so far gathered 148,000 signatures.
Mr Corbyn spent much of his speech earlier examining what had caused the UK to vote to leave and saying what Labour's response would be.
He said Labour's immigration policy would have to change as a result of the vote.
He told an audience of supporters: "We can't duck the issue of immigration. It clearly was a factor. Instead we need to start an honest and rational debate.
"We cannot talk about the issue of immigration as something separate from its economic and social context.
"It is clear from the conversations that I and many others have streets around the country that immigration is a crucial issue for a lot of people.
"Politicians are often accused of being afraid to talk about. I am certainly not.
"I believe that migration has enriched our country, our culture and our communities, and I want to thank those people that have come here.
"We have to move beyond the ... debate (of which) we have sometimes been afraid, or accusing people being little Englanders or racists just because the raise the issue."
He said the Leave side in the referendum debate had not offered an alternative to the EU's policy of free movement of labour.
"Policies on trade, economy and migration will have to change in light of the referendum vote," he said. "But that cannot be left to the likes of Boris Johnson, Nigel Farage and Michael Gove.
"We will be discussing migration."

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Benefits To Blame For Brexit: Dutch Minister

25 June

The Dutch foreign minister has told Sky News that Britain's benefits system is partly to blame for the defeat and departure of David Cameron because it attracts migrants to the UK.

Bert Koenders was speaking after the six original member countries of the European Union called on the UK to speed up the process of leaving, now that it has voted to leave the EU.
He told Sky's Lisa Holland: "You have relatively low wages and at the same time immediately people get a lot of benefits.
"That attracts a lot of migration. It has nothing to do with Europe. It has to do with your domestic rules and regulations.
:: Does A Leave Vote Definitely Mean A Brexit?
"But we are sometimes living in a time when (if) something goes right, it's national, and when it's wrong, it's Europe."
Mr Koenders' comments come after German Chancellor Angela Merkel said there is no need to be "nasty" during talks to discuss Britain's exit from the EU.
She told a news conference it "shouldn't take forever" for Britain to deliver formal notification that it wants to leave the European Union but made it clear that the matter is in London's hands.
France's foreign minister Jean-Marc Ayrault said it was a "matter of respect" that the UK did not "play cat and mouse" with its soon-to-be-former partners. 
Jean-Claude Juncker, the European Commission president, also said there was no reason to wait until David Cameron is replaced in October to begin negotiating Britain's exit.
Mr Juncker said the separation was "not an amicable divorce" and called for discussions to separate the UK from the bloc to begin "immediately".
But Ms Merkel said: "To be honest, it shouldn't take forever, that's right - but I would not fight over a short period of time."
The German leader added that she wanted an "objective, good" climate for in talks on Britain's exit from the EU and that there was no need to make it a priority to deter other countries from attempting to leave the EU as well.
Ms Merkel said that there was "no need to be particularly nasty in any way in the negotiations; they must be conducted properly."
Earlier, it emerged a German government paper has warned that France, Austria, Finland, the Netherlands and Hungary may follow the UK and leave the EU.
The German finance ministry strategy paper expressed concern that the UK's historic vote may trigger a Brexit domino effect across Europe, German newspaper Die Welt said.
It recommended the EU enters into negotiations aimed at making the UK an "associated partner country" for the remaining 27 nations.
As it stands, the UK's exit could cause Germany's contribution to the EU's budget to rise by €3bn (£2.44bn) a year, the paper adds.
The German warning came hours after UKIP leader Nigel Farage declared the "EU is dying" and far-right leaders in France and the Netherlands demanded their own referendums on EU membership.
A number of European nations have started to react in other ways to the vote, with Spain proposing joint sovereignty over Gibraltar, the British Overseas Territory that it shares a land border with.
The French mayor of Calais, meanwhile, says that now the UK is leaving the EU, Britain must renegotiate a deal which allows UK border checks to take place on French soil.

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UK Must Trigger Article 50 Urgently - EU Ministers

25 June

The EU's founding members have demanded the UK urgently invoke Article 50 and start the process of Brexit.

Foreign ministers from the six original members attended a hastily arranged meeting in Berlin - with the UK not invited.
Speaking to reporters afterwards, French minister Jean-Marc Ayrault said it was a "matter of respect" that the UK did not "play cat and mouse" with its soon-to-be-former partners.
David Cameron said yesterday he would leave it to his successor to invoke Article 50, which will start the two-year negotiation of our departure.
A replacement is not expected to be in Number 10 until October - but pressure is mounting on the continent for swifter action.
Mr Ayrault said: "There is a certain urgency ...  It is in Britain's interest and in the interest of Europeans not to have a period of uncertainty that would have financial consequences, and that could have economic and political consequences.
"Of course a new (British) prime minister must be appointed, that will probably require a few days but this is quite urgent."
Germany Foreign Minister Frank-Walter Steinmeier added: "We join together in saying that this process must begin as soon as possible so we don't end up in an extended limbo period but rather can focus on the future of Europe and the work toward it."
The meeting - attended by France, Netherlands, Italy, Belgium, Germany and Luxembourg - comes after European Commission president Jean-Claude Juncker said he wanted Article 50 to be invoked "immediately".
But German Chancellor Angela Merkel has insisted there is no need for European countries to be "nasty" once negotiations begin.
Vote Leave chief Matthew Elliott said on Saturday there was no rush.
"We don't think there is a need to swiftly invoke Article 50," said Mr Elliott.
"It is best for the dust to settle over the summer and during that time for there to be informal negotiations with other states."
On Tuesday EU leaders will open a two-day Brussels summit on the crisis at which a change of direction is likely to be on the agenda.
Belgian Foreign Minister Didier Reynders told reporters Europe must deliver answers on immigration, security and jobs.
Meanwhile, Britain's representative on the EU executive in Brussels, Financial Services Commissioner Jonathan Hill, has stepped down.
Lord Hill said: "I don't believe it is right that I should carry on as the British commissioner as though nothing had happened.
"I came to Brussels as someone who had campaigned against Britain joining the euro and who was sceptical about Europe. I will leave it certain that, despite its frustrations, our membership was good for our place in the world and good for our economy."

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Sturgeon: Indyref 2 Option Very Much On Table

25 June

Nicola Sturgeon has said she will seek to enter into "immediate discussions" with Brussels to "protect Scotland's place in the EU".

Scotland's First Minister said she will establish an advisory panel with experts to advise her on legal, financial and diplomatic matters as she seeks to continue Scotland's membership following the Brexit vote.
Scotland voted 62 to 38% to remain in the EU in Thursday's referendum, sharply contrasting with Britain's overall 52-48% vote to leave.
Speaking outside her official residence in Edinburgh, Ms Sturgeon said her cabinet had agreed to begin work on legislation that would allow for the option of a second independence referendum.
:: The Hurdles Sturgeon Faces Before 'Indyref 2'
Following a meeting with her cabinet, Ms Sturgeon said: "We are determined to act decisively but in a way that builds unity across Scotland about the way forward.
"As I said yesterday, a second independence referendum is clearly an option that requires to be on the table and is very much on the table.
"To ensure that that option is a deliverable one within the required timetable, steps will be taken now to ensure that the necessary legislation is in place. Cabinet this morning formally agreed that work."
The First Minister added: "Cabinet agreed that we will seek to enter into immediate discussions with the EU institutions and other EU member states to explore all possible options to protect Scotland's place in the EU.
"Over the next few days I will establish an advisory panel comprising a range of experts who can advise me and the Scottish Government on a number of important matters - legal, financial and diplomatic."
:: Live: What Do We Do Now We've Gone Brexit?
Scottish independence from the UK was rejected by 55 to 45% in 2014.
Ms Sturgeon will need permission from Westminster to hold a referendum and there must be public confidence in the currency economic opportunity of an independent Scotland.
Opposition parties in Scotland have warned against rushing into a second referendum.
Scottish Conservative leader Ruth Davidson said the 1.6 million votes cast in favour of remaining in the EU "do not wipe away the two million votes that we cast less than two years ago".
She said: "We do not address the challenges of leaving the European Union by leaving our own Union of nations, our biggest market and our closest friends."
Scottish Labour leader Kezia Dugdale said fundamental questions asked during the independence campaign, such as those over currency, remained unanswered.

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Brexit Tories Pile Pressure On 'Dead Duck' PM

25 June

Conservative politicians are increasing the pressure on David Cameron to bring forward negotiations on the UK's departure from the EU and prevent months of uncertainty.

Bernard Jenkin, a Tory MP who was a prominent campaigner for Brexit, said the Prime Minister's plan for his successor to invoke Article 50 in the autumn was unrealistic.
He warned: "I think there is a problem just saying 'right, we're not going to do anything between now and October' to address the European Union relationship, because they don't want us hanging around and destabilising all their arrangements.
"They want certainty, and I think we should be able to do this more quickly."
Mr Jenkin's remarks came after senior EU officials warned the trading bloc would not be held "hostage" as the Tories conducted a leadership race, with Boris Johnson regarded the front runner.
Tory former defence secretary and Leave campaigner Dr Liam Fox has not ruled himself from standing in the upcoming contest and said he would be taking soundings.
Dr Fox, who stood against Cameron in the 2005 Conservative leadership election but failed to make it into the final round of voting, told Sky News tonight: "I am going to have a think about it over this weekend. I will talk to my colleagues, I will talk to my wife."
As the storm clouds gathered for Mr Cameron he fulfilled a commitment to visit Armed Forces Day in Cleethorpes, North East Lincolnshire, where he watched the main parade from the saluting platform.
The Prime Minister chatted to dignitaries on the platform and applauded at the section of the parade devoted to veterans in wheelchairs. As he got into his car to leave the town, he managed a brief wave to the crowds.
:: UK Exit: Juncker Calls For Speedy 'Divorce'
The uncertainty caused by the decisive result for the Out campaign, which attracted 52% support from voters in Thursday's referendum, has already caused the credit rating agency Moody's to downgrade the UK's long-term issuer and debt ratings from stable to negative.
Support for Brexit was unequal across the UK, with the majority of voters in Scotland and Northern Ireland voting to remain in the EU.
The shock victory for the Out campaign prompted the Scottish Cabinet to convene in Edinburgh today, where they discussed the Holyrood administration's next steps.
First Minister Nicola Sturgeon has already warned that a second vote on Scottish independence is now "highly likely" - and described the prospect of the country being taken out of the EU as "democratically unacceptable".
:: The Hurdles Sturgeon Faces Before 'Indyref 2'
Protesters gathered outside the Scottish Parliament in Edinburgh to decry the "torrent of racism" unleashed by the lengthy and bitter EU referendum campaign.
Organisers for the rally said migrants from the trading bloc should be defended, and added: "Unabashed, unchecked racist and xenophobic hyperbole has dominated the entire campaign, with migration being defined as a 'problem' or 'crisis', with bigotry being stoked up against migrants, and with EU citizens here being systematically denied a voice."
A petition on the UK Parliament website is calling for a second EU referendum as no campaign attracted more than 60% of the vote, and turnout was less than 75%.
More than a million people have already signed, which means it will now automatically be considered by a committee for debate by MPs.
:: Live: Shockwaves After Britain Breaks With EU
Another campaign has also begun which calls for London Mayor Sadiq Khan to declare London independent from the UK, so the city can apply to join the EU.
Although potentially tongue in cheek, more than 100,000 people have already signed the petition in support of "Londependence" after most boroughs in the capital voted to remain in the EU.

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