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THE NEWS SERVICE HEARD BY 26 MILLION LISTENERS TO COMMERCIAL RADIO IN THE UK [READ MORE]

Established in 1973 at the birth of commercial radio in the UK, IRN provides client stations with a continuous service of national and international news. The service comprises a ready to air hourly news bulletin, delivered live 24/7, in addition to a suite of pre-recorded news content in the form of news audio cuts on the main stories, written cues and scripts to help stations produce their own bulletins, plus plenty of extra material within sports news, showbiz and music news, money news and consumer technology news.

Top Stories

Crash Captain Screamed 'Open The Damn Door!'

29 March

The captain of the Germanwings jet that crashed in the French Alps reportedly screamed at his co-pilot to "open the damn door" as he tried to get in the cockpit.

Andreas Lubitz, 27, apparently locked the captain out of the cabin and deliberately flew the Germanwings jet into a mountain, killing 150 people.
The older pilot left to use the toilet and then desperately tried to open the cockpit door during Flight 4U 9525's eight-minute descent, according to the black box voice recorder.
Germany's Bild on Sunday newspaper said he is heard shouting: "For God's sake, open the door!" as passengers scream in the background.
He then tries to smash through the heavily-reinforced door with an axe, while yelling at a silent Lubitz to "open the damn door".
Before leaving the cockpit, the captain is heard telling Lubitz he did not have time to go to the toilet before they left Barcelona for Dusseldorf.
German prosecutors believe Lubitz hid an illness from his airline, and had been written off sick on the day of the crash.
He had also sought treatment for vision problems which could have threatened his career, officials told the New York Times.
The Dusseldorf University Hospital said Lubitz had been evaluated at its clinic in February and on 10 March. The hospital has an eye clinic, but it did not comment on why he was being treated citing patient privacy laws.
Police found medicines for treating psychological conditions during searches at his home in Dusseldorf, according to German newspaper Welt am Sonntag.
And Lubitz's ex-girlfriend, Maria W, has claimed he told her: "One day I'm going to do something that will change the whole system, and everyone will know my name and remember."
She told Bild if he did deliberately crash the plane, it was "because he understood that because of his health problems, his big dream of a job at Lufthansa, of a job as captain and as a long-haul pilot was practically impossible".
French police investigator Jean-Pierre Michel has said Lubitz's personality was a "serious lead" in the investigation, but not the only one.
Meanwhile, a father of one of the three British victims called for airlines to do more to look after their pilots.
"I believe the airlines should be more transparent and our finest pilots looked after properly. We put our lives and our children's lives in their hands," said Phillip Bramley, whose son Paul, 28, died in the disaster.
Civil Aviation Authority (CAA) documents suggest some 100 commercial airline pilots in the UK had a history of depression, with 42 still on medication, The Observer has reported.
But Professor Sir Simon Wessely, president of the Royal College of Psychiatrists (RCPsych), said the aviation industry should not "rush" to action in the wake of the crash.
He cited health authorities' knee-jerk reaction to Dr Harold Shipman, who is thought to have killed between 215 and 260 people, as an example of ineffective policy.
Sir Simon said: "It is not a good idea to rush; it is like the response to Dr Shipman, an utterly bizarre and unpredictable event is not a good basis of policy.
"The procedures that they then brought in would not have prevented Shipman.
"I have dealt with some pilots with depression and when they recover they are still monitored. But the two I have dealt with returned to very successful careers. Why should they not?
"What does cause trouble is saying that if you ever have a history of depression then you should not be allowed to do whatever.
"That is wrong, as much as saying that people with a history of broken arms shouldn't be allowed to do something."

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Clarkson Row: BBC Boss 'Sent Death Threats'

29 March

Police are investigating allegations of threats to kill BBC director general Tony Hall, reportedly linked to his decision to drop presenter Jeremy Clarkson from Top Gear.

Lord Hall, 64, and his wife Cynthia have been under 24-hour guard at their Oxfordshire home since the threats were made on Wednesday, according to reports.
"Police in Westminster are investigating an allegation of threats to kill. The allegation was reported to police on Wednesday, 25 March.
"The threat was made by email.
"Enquiries continue to establish from where the email was sent, although the content of the message suggests from outside the UK."
A BBC spokeswoman said: "We wouldn't comment on security matters."
Lord Hall, former chief executive of the Royal Opera House, took over the £450,000 BBC post in April 2013, replacing George Entwistle, who left the corporation in the wake of the Jimmy Savile sex abuse scandal.
He announced on Wednesday that Clarkson would not be retained on the motoring show, saying "a line has been crossed" after the unprovoked attack on producer Oisin Tymon.
He added that "there cannot be one rule for one and one rule for another".
Mr Tymon had his lip split by Clarkson in a 30-second-long assault on 4 March and took himself to hospital with his injuries.
He was also shouted at by the former Top Gear presenter in a torrent of verbal abuse over food at a hotel in North Yorkshire.
Clarkson reported the incident to the BBC five days later and was suspended by the broadcaster on 10 March.
On Friday, Mr Tymon, who has himself received death threats and abuse from trolls on Twitter, said he did not want to press charges against his former colleague.
North Yorkshire Police said the force is still investigating the incident. 
Police could yet bring a charge against 54-year-old Clarkson, although it appears any prosecution would be without the support of the victim himself.
Meanwhile, it remains unclear as to who will take over at Top Gear.
Chris Evans leads the betting as favourite to take over the show, even though he has ruled himself out on more than one occasion.
Top Gear co-hosts James May, 52, and Richard Hammond, 45, have not announced if they will stay at the show or not, but have heavily hinted that they will follow Clarkson out of the corporation.
Asked earlier in the week if he will continue on the BBC2 show, May said the trio came "as a package" and his future requires "a lot of careful thought".

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Tory Grandee 'Puzzled' By Cameron's Two-Term Vow

29 March

Tory grandee Malcolm Rifkind says he is "puzzled" by David Cameron's declaration that he will only serve two terms as Prime Minister.

Mr Cameron last week said he was standing for election to serve for a full second term, but ruled out staying on for a third term.
"Terms are like Shredded Wheat: two are wonderful but three might just be too many," Mr Cameron told BBC News.
Speaking to Sky News' Murnaghan on his last day as a Member of Parliament, Sir Malcolm said he was "surprised" the timing of Mr Cameron's announcement.
"I was puzzled by that. I'm not sure what the thinking was. I think it was to try to come across as somebody - 'I'm not power mad, I've got a job to do, finish the job, time to move on'," Sir Malcolm said.
"It's certainly true that we've got a sort of unofficial rule which Margaret Thatcher and Tony Blair both fell victim to - 10 years and the public say 'thank you very much, don't ring us, we'll ring you'.
"So there was no great astonishment in what he said. It was the timing of it, just before a General Election. I was surprised, I have to say."
The Prime Minister also named three of his senior colleagues - Home Secretary Theresa May, Chancellor George Osborne and London mayor Boris Johnson - as potential successors as Conservative leader when he steps down.
Former foreign secretary Sir Malcolm said: "You cannot remotely assume now who in four or five years time is going to be the frontrunner. It could quite easily be none of the three."
Cabinet Minister Iain Duncan Smith, speaking to BBC1's Andrew Marr Show, also refused to be drawn on who would be the next Tory leader, but suggested it might be someone already in the public eye.
"I don't think that you're going to have in any shape or form a brand-new leader that the country has never seen, because all the people that might want to stand for that will have been up in the public sphere for some time," he said.
Mr Duncan Smith also appeared to contradict Mr Cameron when he said he would have to step down as Tory leader some time during the next Parliament in order for his replacement to be picked ahead of the poll expected in 2020.
The Prime Minister had claimed that he would serve "every day" of a second term and Downing Street suggested that he may fight the 2020 election before handing over to a successor.
Mr Duncan Smith, himself a former Conservative leader, added: "But I have to tell you - I have huge faith and I think this prime minister has done a fantastic job.
"I think I will be sorry to see him go, as and when he chooses to do that, because we have turned the economy around under his stewardship.
"He is actually very keen to say 'There is a limit. There's an amount of time a prime minister should serve before they get stale.' And he is right about that."
Sir Malcolm, who became an MP in 1974, announced he was stepping down at the General Election after he was secretly filmed allegedly offering to use his influence in exchange for cash.
The MP for Kensington has maintained the cash-for-access claims were "completely unfounded" and vowed to "fight them all the way".
He told Sky News' Murnaghan programme he feels "very angry" about the "shoddy, third-rate sting".
"The good news is there's a parliamentary inquiry," he said.
"They will look at the actual transcript of what was said. I'm cooperating very closely with them. I'm delighted they are doing that.
"I will, of course, accept their judgement."
And he refused to say whether or not he would seek to sit in the House of Lords.
"My public life continues - most of my public life is in regard to foreign policy and international issues," he said.

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Man Arrested Over Six-Year-Old Girl's Kidnap

29 March

A man has been arrested over the alleged abduction of a six-year-old girl who went missing in Burnley.

The youngster was taken by a man, possibly in a large dark-coloured car, from Nairne Street in the Lancashire town at about 4pm on Thursday.
She was dropped off three miles away in Whitefield Street, Hapton, where she was found.
After she was returned home, police were called. It is thought she was with the man for around 20 minutes.
Police put out an appeal and launched a manhunt in a bid to find the man who took the girl.
A 33-year-old man from Accrington has now been arrested on suspicion of child abduction and is in custody
Officers are continuing to appeal for information about the incident.
Detective Chief Inspector Joanne McHugh said: "We need anyone who may have witnessed a black coloured car in the Nairne Street or Whitefield Street areas around the time of the abduction to contact us.
"Similarly, if anyone knows anything about this incident at all, please call us on 101."
Alternatively, people can contact Crimestoppers anonymously on 0800 555 111 or online at Crimestoppers-uk.org.

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Police Threat Over Children Playing Adult Games

29 March

Parents of primary school children have been warned they could be reported to police or social services if they let their children play violent or sexual video games.

A group of 15 primary schools and one secondary academy in Nantwich, Cheshire, sent the letter warning adult-themed games, such as Call of Duty and Grand Theft Auto, could lead to "early sexualised behaviours". 
"Several children have reported playing or watching adults play games which are inappropriate for their age and they have described the levels of violence and sexual content they have witnessed: Call Of Duty, Grand Theft Auto, Dogs Of War and other similar games are all inappropriate for children and they should not have access to them," the letter said.
"If your child is allowed to have inappropriate access to any game or associated product that is designated 18-plus we are advised to contact the police and children's social care as it is neglectful."
The letter also warned against giving young children access to social media, including Facebook or WhatsApp, because it "leaves them vulnerable to grooming for sexual exploitation or extreme violence".
The two highest ratings for video games in the UK are Mature - generally suitable for ages 17 and up - and Adults Only - suitable only 18 and over, including prolonged scenes of intense violence, graphic sexual content and/or gambling with real currency.
Video game ratings are set by Pan-European Game Information (PEGI) and it is illegal for retailers to sell 12, 16 and 18 rated games to people below those ages.
It is not, however, illegal for younger children to play them.
Games rated 16 depict violence or sexual activity in a manner "that looks the same as would be expected in real life". They also have more extreme language, encourage the use of tobacco and drugs and the depiction of criminal activities, the Video Standards Council website says.
Games are rated 18 when they include "gross violence".
"In general terms it is where the level of violence is so visually strong that it would make the reasonable viewer react with a sense of revulsion," the council says.

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