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THE NEWS SERVICE HEARD BY 26 MILLION LISTENERS TO COMMERCIAL RADIO IN THE UK [READ MORE]

Established in 1973 at the birth of commercial radio in the UK, IRN provides client stations with a continuous service of national and international news. The service comprises a ready to air hourly news bulletin, delivered live 24/7, in addition to a suite of pre-recorded news content in the form of news audio cuts on the main stories, written cues and scripts to help stations produce their own bulletins, plus plenty of extra material within sports news, showbiz and music news, money news and consumer technology news.

Top Stories

Police Officer Cleared Of Azelle Rodney Murder

03 July

A former Scotland Yard firearms officer, who shot dead an armed drug dealer in north London 10 years ago, has been cleared of murder.

An Old Bailey jury found Anthony Long, 58, not guilty of murdering Azelle Rodney during an operation to foil an attempt to rob Colombian drug dealers in north London in 2005.
Mr Rodney and two other criminals had been under surveillance and police intelligence suggested that the gang was armed with at least one machine gun as they prepared to strike the Colombians.
PC Long was part of a Specialist Firearms team brought in to stop the Volkswagen Golf that Azelle Rodney and the other two men were travelling in.
The firearms team pulled over the men's car in Hale Lane, Edgware, north London at 7:43pm on 30 April, in a manoeuvre known as a "hard stop" where a vehicle is boxed in by police cars to force it to a halt.
The Old Bailey was told that Anthony Long opened fire as his car pulled up alongside the VW Golf, shooting Azelle Rodney six times.
The Crown Prosecution Service charged the now retired officer with murder after judicial inquiry in 2013 found that PC Long had no lawful justification for opening fire.
During the Old Bailey trial, prosecutors claimed the officer fired eight shots in 2.1 seconds, six of which hit Mr Rodney who was the back seat passenger in the Golf.
The Crown claimed that, in making the split-second decision to open fire, the officer would not have had time to see whether Mr Rodney was doing anything that might pose a risk to the public and police.
However, the jury believed Mr Long's assertion that he perceived a threat to himself and his colleagues when he opened fire.
The court was told that in a subsequent search of the Golf, officers discovered three handguns.
Afterwards, Mr Long said he was "very grateful" to the jury for their verdict, adding: "It has been very difficult facing trial for something that happened 10 years ago when I had acted to protect the lives of others as part of my job and based on my training and experience.
"Police firearms officers do not go out intending to shoot people and, like me in this case, have to make split-second life or death decisions based on the information available to them at the time." 
The verdict is a bitter blow for Azelle Rodney's family, who've campaigned for years for someone to be held accountable for his death.
After the verdict, Mr Rodney's mother Susan Alexander repeated her view that her son's death was "wholly avoidable", adding that she would, nevertheless, accept the jury's verdict.
She added: "Now that the jury has done its job, my family and I have to draw a painful line under the last 10 years. I need some time to myself to grieve properly for the loss of my 24-year-old son."
Mr Long was a highly-decorated firearms veteran who helped establish Scotland Yard's elite firearms unit.
He was commended for his bravery in 1985 after shooting and wounding a hostage-taker who was trying to stab a young girl in Northolt, west London.
Two years later, Mr Long helped foil an armed robbery on a payroll delivery at an abattoir in south east London.
He shot dead two of the robbers and wounded a third.  A subsequent inquiry cleared him of any wrongdoing.

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Tunisia: Tributes To Beach Massacre Dead

03 July

Britain has paused for a minute's silence to remember the holidaymakers shot dead by a terrorist while they sunbathed on a Tunisian beach last week.

The Queen, who was at the University of Strathclyde in Glasgow, and Prime Minister David Cameron, who was in his constituency in Oxfordshire, joined millions of people across Britain as Big Ben chimed midday.
A group of tourists in the resort of Sousse gathered around a shrine of flowers on the beach where 38 people were massacred, 30 of them British.
Standing yards from the rows of sunbeds on which people died, they were protected by soldiers and police armed with automatic weapons.
Back in Britain, sporting events at Wimbledon and the Henley Regatta were delayed to allow fans, competitors and match officials to pay their respects. At Essex County Ground in Chelmsford the touring Australian Ashes cricket team joined Essex players and officials bowing their heads during a break in play.
And standing in silence with his family at Banks' Stadium in Walsall, was 16-year-old Owen Richards who survived the attack. He was paying quiet tribute to brother Joel, 19, his uncle Adrian Evans, 49, and his grandfather Patrick Evans, 78. All three died after being shot.
The football club's playing squad and manager Dean Smith stood shoulder-to-shoulder among flowers and scarves when a whistle blew to herald the start of the silence. Joel had been a promising referee and all three were fans of the team.
In Cumbernauld, North Lanarkshire, a church service was held to remember Scottish victims Jim and Ann McQuire while a candlelit vigil is planned for Billy and Lisa Graham in their home region of Perthshire.
Passengers at Glasgow Airport fell silent and, along with buildings such as Buckingham Palace and 10 Downing Street in London, the Scottish Parliament in Edinburgh also flew flags at half-mast.
Silence was also observed at the Appeal Court in Edinburgh where a hearing was to take place deciding whether relatives of Lockerbie bombing victims could pursue a posthumous appeal on behalf of Abdelbaset al Megrahi, the only man convicted of the murders.
The one-minute silence was also observed at Silverstone, which is hosting Sunday's British Grand Prix.
At St Nicholas's Church in Biddestone, Wiltshire, people attended a service in memory of Eileen Swannack, 73, who had lived in the village for many decades, and her partner John Welch, 74, who had lived in a neighbouring village.
Sky News reporter Alex Rossi described the service as "very moving, very poignant".
He added: "People here are really struggling to come to terms with what has happened to a couple who were very well-known in this village and very popular."
The ceremony on Sousse beach in Tunisia was attended by the British ambassador Hamish Cowell, Tunisian Prime Minister Habib Essid and dignitaries from other nations affected.
Along with the British victims of shooter Seifeddine Rezgui, three Irish nationals, two Germans, one Belgian, one Russian and one Portuguese were also murdered.
The Muslim Council of Britain called on mosques and imams to deliver a sermon of peace at Friday prayers and Qadir Ahmad Chohan, chairman of Manchester Council of Mosques, told Sky News: “The Muslim community does not accept any suggestion that these killings can ever be justified by Islam.
“There are 2.7m Muslims here (in the UK) and also 1.6bn Muslims all over the world and these terrorists do not represent Islam. They are the killers, terrorists and they should be stopped.
“We will do everything to prevent the seeds of hate being planted in the UK and elsewhere.”
So far, 17 of the British victims have been flown back to the UK with eight more expected today.
The first of the inquests has also been opened, with West London coroner Chinyere Inyama adjourning the first - that of Stephen Mellor, 59, who died from gunshot wounds to the chest and abdomen as he tried to shield his wife Cheryl during the massacre.
Sky News reporter Richard Suchet says the UK counter-terror unit has identified 1,200 possible witnesses to the attack who have returned home. Almost 300 of them have already been spoken to.
More inquests will be opened during the weekend.

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Who Were The Tunisia Beach Attack Victims?

03 July

A total of 38 people died in the attack at Tunisia's Sousse beach resort, including 30 Britons and three Irish citizens.

All were on holiday in the country when gunman Seifeddine Rezgui opened fire on sunbathing tourists.
Most were with friends, family, spouses or partners. Tributes have been paid.
:: Christopher And Sharon Bell
The couple from Leeds were on holiday together in Sousse when they were killed, with their family saying they are "deeply saddened" by their deaths.
:: Patrick and Adrian Evans
Sandwell Council gas department worker Adrian Evans was killed along with his 78-year-old father, Patrick, and nephew Joel Richards.
:: Joel Richards
A talented referee and footballer, the Birmingham County Football Association said the 19-year-old had "the world at his feet".
:: Trudy Jones
Trudy Jones, a 51-year-old divorced single mother-of-four, had been on holiday with her friends.
:: Bruce Wilkinson
The 72-year-old was on holiday with his wife, Rita, when he was shot dead.
:: Lisa Burbidge
A regular visitor the Hotel Riu Imperial Marhaba, the grandmother-of-four was on holiday with her family.
:: Billy and Lisa Graham
The Perth couple's family had initially appealed for information about their whereabouts, before revealing the pair were among the victims.
:: Carly Lovett
The 24-year-old fashion and beauty blogger from Lincolnshire was staying in Tunisia with her fiance, Liam Moore.
:: Lorna Carty
Lorna Carty, from County Meath in Ireland, was on holiday with her husband, Declan, who was recovering from heart surgery.
:: Sue Davey and Scott Chalkley
Ms Davey and Mr Chalkley were both Severn Trent Water employees.
:: Laurence (Larry) and Martina Hayes
Laurence and Martina Hayes, from Athlone, County Westmeath, were both in their 50s.
:: Claire Windass
Claire Windass was next to her husband, Jim, on the beach when she was killed.
:: Jim and Ann McQuire
Jim and Ann McQuire, aged 66 and 63, were from Cumbernauld, in north Lanarkshire, Scotland.
:: Stuart Cullen
Stuart Cullen was with his wife on holiday in Tunisia and died instantly after being shot.
:: Philip Heathcote
Philip Heathcote was with wife Allison in Tunisia for a holiday to celebrate their 30th wedding anniversary
:: Denis and Elaine Thwaites
Both retired, Denis and Elaine Thwaites were from Blackpool in Lancashire and had arrived in Sousse two days before the attack.
:: Stephen Mellor
Stephen Mellor was in Sousse with wife Cheryl, who he was shielding from bullets when he was killed on the beach.
:: John Welch and Eileen Swannack
John Welch, 74, and Eileen Swannack, 70, were confirmed as dead by Eileen's granddaughter, Lucie Marie.
:: John and Janet Stocker
The family of John and Janet Stocker paid tribute to the "happiest, most loving couple" after it was confirmed they were killed in the Tunisia beach attack.
:: David Thompson
David Thompson, 80, was a retired scientist from Tadley in Hampshire.
:: John Stollery
John Stollery, a 58-year-old social worker from Nottinghamshire, was on holiday with his wife Cheryl and their son.
:: Chris Dyer
The 32-year-old engineer from Watford was on holiday with his wife, Gina Van Dort, when he was shot dead.
:: Angie and Ray Fisher
Leicester couple Ray and Angie Fisher remained unaccounted for until almost a week after the atrocity.

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Max Clifford Charged With Indecent Assault

03 July

Max Clifford has been charged with one count of indecent assault allegedly committed in 1981, the Crown Prosecution Service has said.

The former public relations executive will appear at Westminster Magistrates Court on 21 July.
Scotland Yard said the charge relates to a woman aged over 16.
Baljit Ubhey, Chief Crown Prosecutor for CPS London, said the CPS had considered evidence gathered as part of Operation Yewtree in making the decision.
She said: "Having completed our review, we have concluded that there is sufficient evidence and it is in the public interest for Mr Clifford to be charged with one offence of indecent assault."
Clifford represented some of the biggest names in showbusiness during a career that spanned more than four decades.
He became well known for brokering deals with tabloid newspapers for kiss-and-tell stories.
He formerly represented pop mogul Simon Cowell, the late reality TV star Jade Goody and boxer Muhammad Ali.

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Prison Officer Dies After Alleged Assault

03 July

A prison custody officer who was allegedly assaulted by a prisoner at a court has died, Scotland Yard has confirmed.

Lorraine Barwell, from Romford, northeast London, was attacked at Blackfriars Crown Court as she escorted the prisoner between the court and a waiting van in the courtyard.
The 54-year-old, who worked for security company Serco, was treated at the scene by London's Air Ambulance service before being taken to an east London hospital.
Humphrey Blake, 22, of no fixed abode, appeared at Camberwell Green Magistrates' Court on Wednesday charged with grievous bodily harm over the alleged assault.
He was remanded in custody and will appear at the Old Bailey on 15 July.
Rupert Soames, chief executive of Serco, said the company was "appalled and saddened" by Ms Barwell's death, and would do "everything we can" to support her family and friends.
He added: "Lorraine was a brave and experienced Prisoner Custody Officer who was a popular and highly respected member of our team, and had worked for Serco for over ten years.
"She will be sorely missed by everyone who worked with her. 
"The team who escort and look after prisoners as they travel to and from court perform an important and difficult public service, and we should all appreciate the work they do."
Oscar Garcia-Villaverde, who worked with Ms Barwell, said: "Everyone who worked with Lorraine, who was affectionately known as Rocky, is absolutely devastated by what has happened.
"Lorraine was really well-liked and she had many friends here; we will all miss her dreadfully. Our thoughts are with her family."  
Justice Secretary Michael Gove also paid tribute.
He said: "Lorraine Barwell was a courageous and dedicated prisoner custody officer who delivered a vital public service for more than a decade.
"She, like thousands of prison officers across the country, worked hard in challenging circumstances to keep the public safe.
"My department will provide every assistance to the police as they investigate this incident."
The POA, the professional trades union for prison, correctional and secure psychiatric workers, said the "unspeakable crime" should serve as a reminder of the "violent and unpredictable nature of the criminal justice workplace".
The union added in a statement: "This is not about public good, private bad, or vice versa, but a stark illustration that staff within the criminal justice system care for and control violent criminals 24 hours a day every day of the year in the essential protection of the public."

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