The news service heard by 26 million listeners to commercial radio in the UK

Top Stories

Corbyn vows 'to turn back the Tory tide' after Copeland loss

26 February

Jeremy Corbyn is claiming he can "turn back the Tory tide" despite a new opinion poll suggesting Labour would perform much better with a new leader.

After Labour was swept away by the Conservatives in Copeland, Mr Corbyn will attempt to fight back in a speech at the Scottish Labour conference in Perth.
Ahead of his speech, the embattled Labour leader says he takes his share of responsibility for Copeland - but blames globalisation and a rigged economy.
"We haven't done enough yet to rebuild trust with people who have been ripped off and sold out for decades and don't feel Labour represents them," he wrote in the Sunday Mirror.
"But if we stand together, I am confident we can do that and turn back the Tory tide."
Defiantly rejecting calls to step down, he added: "I was re-elected Labour leader five months ago with a bigger majority and I am determined to finish that job: to reconnect Labour with our working class voters and values - so we can win power to rebuild and transform Britain, for the many, not just the few."
A ComRes poll, also in the Sunday Mirror, strongly contradicts Mr Corbyn's claims:
:: 31% say they would be more likely to vote Labour if the party was not led by Mr Corbyn;
:: 77% of non-Labour voters don't believe the party has the right leader; and
:: 71% of this group believe Labour has lost touch with the working classes.
The poll suggests the most popular alternative leader to Mr Corbyn would be London mayor Sadiq Khan, who was given a rousing reception by Labour activists at the Scottish conference in Perth.
More than 100 miles south of Copeland, in Wigan - solidly Labour since 1918 - Sky News found that Mr Corbyn divides opinion among voters.
"He's got the true values of working class people," said one man. "I think the Parliamentary Labour Party should get behind him."
But one female voter said: "I just don't like him - don't know what the word is - I think he lies a bit."
And another woman said: "I don't think any of them know what's best for us at the moment. It'll have to be wait and see and hope for the best."
Wigan's MP, Lisa Nandy, speaking on Sophy Ridge on Sunday, says it's no good Mr Corbyn blaming globalisation and a rigged economy for results like Copeland.
"The trouble with looking at every factor apart from Labour is that it's just a thoroughly inadequate response," she told Sky News.
"If we really want to address what has been happening to the Labour Party for a very long time, then we as a party need to get out of our comfort zone and start confronting some of the very difficult issues we face."
Asked by Sophy if she gave Mr Corbyn a year to turn things around, the MP said: "That's what his close team said, that they're determined to do that within a year - and I think that's absolutely critical.
"We can't obviously go into a general election in the state that we're currently in."

READ MORE

Trump won't attend White House correspondents' dinner

26 February

Donald Trump will not attend the annual White House Correspondents' Association dinner, a high-profile event that draws celebrities, politicians and journalists.

The announcement marks a break with an annual tradition where the US president is the guest of honour.
It came as the US President has lashed out as some media, calling some "fake news" and "the enemy of the people".
The attacks have strained relationships with the press.
"I will not be attending the White House Correspondents' Association Dinner this year. Please wish everyone well and have a great evening!", Mr Trump wrote on Twitter on Saturday.
The annual dinner is a light-hearted roast held by journalists and attended by celebrities. This year it is held on 29 April in Washington.
Some news outlets such as Bloomberg News and The New Yorker, which usually host lavish after-parties, had already backed out this year.
The dinner "has been and will continue to be a celebration of the First Amendment and the important role played by an independent news media in a healthy republic," said Jeff Mason, a Reuters White House correspondent who heads the association this year.
On Friday, the White House excluded several major US news organisations from an off-camera briefing held by the White House press secretary.
Reporters for CNN, The New York Times, Politico, The Los Angeles Times and BuzzFeed were not allowed into the session in the office of press secretary Sean Spicer, a decision that drew strong protests and led some to boycott the briefing.

READ MORE

Kim Jong-Nam murder: Kuala Lumpur airport safe after toxic checks

26 February

Police have completed a "forensic sweep" of one of the terminals at Kuala Lumpur airport where the exiled half-brother of North Korea's leader was poisoned and killed.

Malaysian officials declared it safe after completing the operation to check for possible traces of a toxic nerve agent suspected to have been used in the attack on Kim Jong-Nam.
The two-hour sweep involved officers from the police's chemical, biological, radiological and nuclear teams, as well as the fire department's hazardous materials unit and the government's atomic energy board.
Senior police official Abdul Samah Mat, who is leading the investigation, declared the terminal a "safe zone" after the no hazardous material was detected.
:: What is VX nerve agent and what does it do?
Officials had previously insisted the airport - which has seen tens of thousands of passengers pass through since the attack nearly two weeks ago - was safe.
No areas had been cordoned off or protective measures put in place, although officials have said the footsteps of the suspects' were being traced in order to "ensure public safety".
The attack on Mr Kim took place on 13 February.
Health minister Subramaniam Sathasivam said on Sunday that post mortem results suggested that the banned chemical weapon VX nerve agent caused "very serious paralysis" that led to Mr Kim's death.
The VX agent can lead to death very quickly in high doses, he added.
Meanwhile, one of the female suspects arrested for the murder claimed she was paid the equivalent of £72 to carry out what she believed was a "prank".
Indonesian national Siti Aisyah said she had been handed 400 Malaysian ringgits to smear an oily substance - similar to baby oil - onto Mr Kim's face.
The 25-year-old suspect also said she did not want her parents to see her in custody as she did not want them to be "sad" and was worried about their health.
A 28-year-old Vietnamese woman - who said she believed she was "starring in some sort of comedy video" - and a North Korean man have also been arrested.
Police are currently hunting for further suspects, including four North Korean men who they believe provided the women with poison before fleeing the country.
Malaysian officials have also warned they will issue an arrest warrant for North Korean diplomat Hyon Kwang Song if he refused to cooperate with the investigation.
They had previously acknowledged his right to diplomatic immunity, which meant he could not be forced to attend questioning.

READ MORE

Dozens injured as truck ploughs into crowd in New Orleans

26 February

Police say 28 people have been hurt after a pickup truck ploughed into crowds attending a Mardi Gras parade in New Orleans.

Of the 21 people taken to hospital following the crash, five victims are in a "guarded condition".
The incident happened during the Krewe of Endymion parade in the state of Louisiana at about 6.45pm local time.
One person has been taken into custody following the crash on suspicion of driving while intoxicated.
Children as young as three years old are among those injured - as well as a New Orleans police officer.
Investigators have stressed they do not believe it was a terrorist incident.
"We send a strong message about not drinking and driving, and about making smart decisions," New Orleans police superintendent Michael Harrison said.
Kourtney McKinnis told the New Orleans Advocate that the driver seemed almost unaware of what he had done in the aftermath of the crash.
"He was just kind of out of it," the 20-year-old said.
The incident happened on one of the busiest nights of Mardi Gras, with thousands of people descending on the city to watch elaborate floats and catch beads and trinkets thrown by performers.
More follows...

READ MORE

Political protests to dominate Oscars as stars rally against Trump

26 February

The head of the Academy Awards has told Sky News she supports stars who make political statements from the Oscars stage.

Hollywood's biggest night is set to be dominated by the spectre of the controversial presidency of Donald Trump.
Stars have already used pre-Oscars events to promise resistance to Mr Trump's agenda.
And Academy president Cheryl Boone Isaacs told Sky News she will not condemn stars who use the Oscars platform to make political points.
She said: "One thing we are all happy about is we have freedom of speech.
"It makes it very human, I think, because it is of the moment and no one knows what name is going to be read off the envelope so it pretty spontaneous.
"I think and I hope that those on stage will give 45 seconds of something really meaningful and touching."
Meryl Streep set the tone for awards season assaults on Mr Trump with her condemnation of the president at the Golden Globes. He responded by calling her overrated.
A major Hollywood talent agency cancelled its traditional pre-Oscars party and instead held a "unity" rally to raise money for the American Civil Liberties Union. Stars including Jodie Foster appeared on stage in front of 1,200-strong crowd in Beverly Hills.
:: Oscars 2017: Full list of nominations
But some Oscar nominees believe it is wrong for stars to make political statements.
British-American star Andrew Garfield, nominated for best actor for his performance in Hacksaw Ridge, said: "Unfortunately celebrity culture has got to the point where a celebrity's voice is more meaningful than other people's in certain ways.
"That it is a shame and shouldn't be the case. I am not a big fan of that as a cultural state that we're in."
The Oscars have seen political protests before. In 1973, Marlon Brando boycotted his award for The Godfather over the treatment of Native Americans by Hollywood.
Director Michael Moore was booed off stage in 2003 for criticising George W Bush, who was president at the time.
:: Oscars predictions: Who will win and who should
The debate about politics and Donald Trump has replaced the controversy over diversity at the Oscars, which has dominated discussion in recent years.
Some movie business stalwarts believe stars should be able to share their opinions.
Brian McLaughlin, a film producer and instructor at the LA film school, said: "These folks have given us countless hours of entertainment. For us to give them 30 seconds to speak on an important issue, I think, is a fair trade and good for democracy."
:: Watch the 2017 Oscars, starting with live red carpet action from 11.30pm on Sky Oscars HD tonight, and news of the winners live from Hollywood on Sky News from 6am Monday morning.

READ MORE