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Jeremy Hunt says he agrees '150%' with Donald Trump's criticism of Sadiq Khan

17 June

Tory leadership contender Jeremy Hunt has said he agrees "150%" with Donald Trump's criticism of Sadiq Khan on knife crime.

The US president and the London mayor have been engaged in a long-running feud over the issue.
And the war of words continued at the weekend, with Mr Trump sharing a post from political commentator Katie Hopkins.
Her original post referred to the capital as "Stab-City" and "Khan's Londonistan" alongside two screenshots of BBC News articles about the violence.
Quoting this post, Mr Trump wrote: "LONDON needs a new mayor ASAP. Khan is a disaster - will only get worse!"
Speaking at a Westminster hustings for Tory leadership hopefuls, Mr Hunt said the US president "has his own style" and he "would not use those words myself".
The foreign secretary added: "But the sentiment is enormous disappointment that we have a Mayor of London who has completely failed to tackle knife crime and has spent more time on politics than the actual business of making Londoners safer and in that I 150% agree with the president."
Leadership rival Sajid Javid, the home secretary, slammed Mr Trump, saying it was "unbecoming" for the US president to intervene in an ally's domestic politics.
He said: "I think President Trump should stick to domestic policies and I think it is unbecoming of a leader of such a great state to keep trying to interfere in other countries' domestic policies."
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Mr Javid added: "The president is right to be concerned about serious violence but he should be concerned about the serious violence in his own country, where it is more than 10 times higher than it is in the UK."
International Development Secretary Rory Stewart said in a response to Hopkins' tweet: "I 100% disagree with both the language and the sentiment of the last sentence of this tweet. Can all candidates please confirm the same."
Tory peer Baroness Warsi, the first Muslim woman to serve in cabinet, said she had spoken to Mr Hunt since his comments.
She said Mr Hunt had "assured me that he abhors Katie Hopkins, her disgusting views and everything she stands for".
Baroness Warsi, a former Conservative Party chairwoman, added: "He believes the term Londonistan is offensive and would never endorse sentiments that try and frame London's knife crime challenge as a racial or religious phenomenon.
"We should always call out racism but also important to allow people to clarify and judge them accordingly."
Reacting to the president's latest attack, Mr Khan said: "It's for Donald Trump to explain his tweets, not for me, but it's remarkable that you've got the president of the USA amplifying the tweets of a far-right activist, amplifying a racist tweet.
"That's one of my concerns about Donald Trump - he's now seen as a poster boy for racists around the world, whether you're a racist in this country, whether you're a racist in Hungary, a racist in Italy, or a racist in France.
"He's now a poster boy for the far-right movement and that should cause us huge concern."
Mr Khan claimed the US president was "obsessed" with him and said that many cities were facing an increase in violent crime.
He added: "There are many good leaders in America facing massive increases in violent crime, they have my support to make sure we learn lessons from each other and that we work together to grapple the issue of violent crime taking place in many cities across the Western world."
The leadership hustings did not feature frontrunner Boris Johnson, who declined to take part.
The former foreign secretary also did not appear at a Channel 4 debate on Sunday, drawing criticism that he is avoiding scrutiny.
But supporters defended his decision not to participate.
Brexit minister James Cleverly told Sky News: "At this stage in the process, it's about winning support of parliamentary colleagues, which is what Boris Johnson is doing.
"He's been very successful in that and I hope he continues to be successful in that.
"When it comes down to the final two, that's the appropriate point in the process to have the wider debate with the membership of the Conservative party and the country as a whole."
Jacob Rees-Mogg, chairman of the European Research Group of eurosceptic Tory MPs, said Sunday night's contest was the "wrong stage for a debate" because it was "too early" and there were "too many candidates".
The second ballot of Conservative MPs will take place on Tuesday, with Mr Johnson again expected to easily come top.
Ahead of the vote, Mr Johnson was boosted by backing of Health Secretary Matt Hancock, who pulled out of the race last week.
All eyes will be on who finishes second and which candidates are eliminated from the race, with the support of 33 MPs required to progress.
Mr Javid, Mr Stewart and Dominic Raab - who all got under 30 votes in the first ballot - have all insisted they have enough supporters to make it through.

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London mayor Sadiq Khan attacks police cuts after four murders in four days

17 June

Mayor of London Sadiq Khan has said he is "incredibly concerned" about a recent spate of murders in the capital - placing the blame for rising violence on "massive cuts" to police resources.

The Metropolitan Police has stepped up patrols after four people were killed in as many days - and Mr Khan said officers from the "overstretched" force worked 12-hour shifts over the weekend.
He said officers were working "incredibly hard" to tackle violent crime, but reiterated his call for more funding from the government.
Mr Khan told Sky News: "Over the past five years we've seen across our country - in Cardiff, Manchester, Liverpool, Leeds, Bristol - an increase in violent crime, and we've seen it in London as well.
"We've made some progress but it's no consolation if you've lost a loved one or are the victim of knife crime. We need to do far more."
:: London's four days of violence

  • Friday, 4.42pm - man, 18, stabbed to death in Wandsworth
  • Friday, 4.54pm - Eniola Aluko, 19, shot dead in Plumstead
  • Saturday, 2.37pm - man, 34, dies after stabbing in Tower Hamlets
  • Sunday, 9.40pm - man, believed to be 17, suffers gunshot wound in Tulse Hill
  • Monday, 1.01am - man, 42, dies after stabbing in Statford
  • Monday, 11.39am - man, 28, injured after reports of a shooting in Leytonstone
Mr Khan refuted suggestions that crime in the capital had risen as a result of his time at City Hall, with his predecessor Boris Johnson having talked up his record during the Conservative leadership contest.
The current mayor said London had suffered for having fewer police officers "than at any time since 2003", with the number now below 30,000.
Paying tribute to the efforts of officers, Mr Khan said: "This weekend they've cancelled leave, worked 12-hour shifts, cancelled rest days - they're under-resourced, overstretched and working incredibly hard.
"We've lost thousands of police staff, more than 40 youth clubs, many teachers and cuts made in public services, in preventative services. Even the Home Office's own civil servants say there is a link between massive cuts in police resources and an increase in violent crime."
The first of the latest four deadly knife attacks came on Friday afternoon, when an 18-year-old man was fatally stabbed in Wandsworth. Shortly afterwards, 19-year-old Eniola Aluko was shot dead in Plumstead.
On Saturday, a man in his 30s was stabbed to death in Tower Hamlets.
And in the early hours of Monday, a 42-year-old man was stabbed to death in Stratford.
Two people - 18-year-old Mohammed Nadir Dafallah, and a 17-year-old boy who cannot be named for legal reasons - have been charged with murder after the Wandsworth attack and are due to appear in court later.
Four others, aged between 16 and 19, have been released under investigation, and a 20-year-old man is in custody for questioning after being arrested on Monday.
Five arrests have been made in connection with the attack on Mr Aluko, but there have been none regarding the Tower Hamlets or Stratford incidents.
Detectives investigating the latter issued a renewed appeal for information on Monday, with a crime scene and several road closures still in place in the vicinity of Whalebone Lane.
Following reports of the deaths, Mr Khan came under attack from his regular critic Donald Trump, who said in a tweet that the mayor was a "national disgrace" and a "disaster".
The US president also shared a tweet about the murders written by outspoken right-wing commentator Katie Hopkins, in which she called the capital "Stab-City" and "Khan's Londonistan".
Mr Khan accused Mr Trump of "amplifying far-right activists" and being seen as a "poster boy for racists".
He added: "My concern isn't that he's obsessed with me, my concern is the amplification of a racist tweet that normalises racism - and that's wrong."

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Mohammed Morsi: Ousted Egyptian president dies in court

17 June

Ousted Egyptian president Mohammed Morsi has died after collapsing in court on Monday.

Speaking from a glass cage, where detainees are held during hearings, the 67-year-old spoke of the "many secrets" he had harboured, before fainting minutes later.
The hearing at the courthouse in Cairo's Tura Prison was part of a re-trial for espionage charges relating to the Palestinian Hamas militant group.
A statement from Egypt's attorney general said surveillance cameras inside the court would be reviewed, and a post-mortem would be carried out.
Mr Morsi rose to power as the leader of the now-banned Muslim Brotherhood group, before becoming Egypt's first democratically elected president in July 2012.
He was ousted just a year later in a military coup led by Abdel Fattah Al-Sisi, who is Egypt's current president, and was arrested alongside other Muslim Brotherhood leaders.
It followed weeks of huge anti-government protests across the North African nation.
The wellbeing of the former president, who has been detained since the coup, has repeatedly featured in the headlines.
His son Ahmed spoke to media about the "severe deterioration" of his father's health in prison, and said authorities had "ignored" his needs.
Mohammed Sudan, a member of the London branch of the Muslim Brotherhood group, said Mr Morsi's death amounted to "premeditated murder".
He said: "He has been placed behind glass cage [during trials]."
"No one can hear him or know what is happening to him. He hasn't received any visits for a months or nearly a year. He complained before that he doesn't get his medicine. This is premeditated murder. This is slow death."
Meanwhile, Human Rights Watch said the incident was "predictable" given authorities' "failure" to provide necessary care.
The organisation pointed to a report that it had written two years earlier, which described the "cruel and inhumane" treatment Mr Morsi had received in detention.
It detailed "appalling conditions" that led to him losing weight, fainting, and experiencing a diabetic coma.
Turkish President Recep Tayyip Erdogan said on Monday that Mr Morsi was a "brother" and a "martyr", and sent condolences to the Muslim Brotherhood and the Egyptian population.
More to follow...

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Paris Air Show: Airbus launches new long-range jet as Boeing struggles

17 June

Airbus has launched a new long-range jet at the start of the Paris Air Show as main rival Boeing continues to face questions over the crisis for its 737 MAX fleet.

Airbus said the single aisle A321XLR - an updated version of the existing A321 - would offer customers a 4,700 nautical mile range and a greater fuel efficiency of up to 30% from 2023.
It is a market that both firms see growing strongly as the sector comes under pressure to ease emissions and develop electric-powered planes.
The Los Angeles-based Air Lease Corporation signed a letter of intent to buy 27 of the new aircraft following the announcement, while Airbus was also boosted by news of a $4.1bn (£3.3bn) Virgin Atlantic order for 14 A330-900 planes.
Boeing has said it is still working on the design of a new mid-size plane for the same market as the A321XLR.
It has so far used the annual Paris show - traditionally the largest marketplace for both civilian and military aircraft - to offer further apologies and reassurances over two fatal 737 Max crashes.
They left 346 people dead while the second tragedy - the loss of an Ethiopian Airlines plane in March - led to all Boeing's 737 MAX planes being withdrawn from service.
Boeing's head of commercial aircraft, Kevin McAllister, told reporters in Paris: "We are very sorry for the loss of lives" .
Investigations have centred on flight control software and Boeing has been working to establish a fix that will satisfy global aviation regulators.
It is believed that angle-measuring sensors in both planes malfunctioned, alerting anti-stall software to push the noses of the planes down.
Other Boeing executives at the show stressed the company's focus on safety and offered condolences to the victims' families as the company refused to put a time frame on when planes could return to service.
In addition to safety concerns, the global economic slowdown and trade tensions are weighing on the wider mood in Paris.
The event opened just hours after Lufthansa became the latest major airline to issue a profit warning.
Its update centred on tough competition for its budget operations at a time of higher fuel bills.
Paris order totals are expected to dwarf those of 2018 - possibly by up to 50%, according to aviation consultancy IBA, as companies juggle the financial pressures.

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Elon Musk says he has deleted his Twitter page. There's just one problem

17 June

Elon Musk has left his 27 million followers confused by claiming he has deleted his Twitter account - despite his profile remaining live for all to see.

The Tesla chief executive tweeted "Just deleted my Twitter account" and changed his profile picture to black, although the account still appears to be active.
There was mixed reaction from internet users, with some seeming dismayed by his apparent departure and others claiming it was prompted by an earlier online dispute.
In a now-deleted tweet, Mr Musk posted a piece of art but was quickly criticised for not crediting the original artist.
He wrote in response: "No one should be credited with anything ever."
The entrepreneur has recently made a number of bizarre postings on Twitter, including changing his name to Daddy DotCom on Father's Day.
One Twitter user wrote: "I can't believe elon musk has fully followed the trajectory of an angry forum teenager in a single day, all the way from initial dispute to claiming you're deleting your account and then not actually deleting it."
Another said: "I'm no expert but I think you actually have to delete your account to delete your account."
One person even joked, "Luckily I, Elon Musk, have this second account which is definitely run by me."
Several users questioned whether his account had been hacked.
Mr Musk's supposed social media departure comes after the Tesla CEO agreed to have his social media posts regarding the carmaker pre-approved by a lawyer.
He landed himself in hot water with the Securities and Exchange Commission (SEC) after tweeting that he had secured funding to take the company private at $420 (£325) a share, despite not having the money to pull off the deal.
Mr Musk originally reached a settlement with the SEC in September last year, but it later brought a case alleging he violated the settlement.
In April, Mr Musk agreed to seek lawyer approval before tweeting about topics including Tesla's finances, potential mergers, sales figures, new business lines or a change in company directors.

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